ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

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ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

John MacFarlane
I'm pleased to announce the release of pandoc version 1.0.0.1.

Pandoc aspires to be the swiss army knife of text markup formats: it
can read markdown and (with some limitations) HTML, LaTeX, and
reStructuredText, and it can write markdown, reStructuredText, HTML,
DocBook XML, OpenDocument XML, ODT, RTF, groff man, MediaWiki markup,
GNU Texinfo, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and S5.  Pandoc's markdown syntax includes
extensions for LaTeX math, tables, definition lists, footnotes, and more.

HackageDB:        http://hackage.haskell.org/cgi-bin/hackage-scripts/package/pandoc
User's guide:     http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/README.html
Examples:         http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/examples.html
Interactive demo: http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/trypandoc/
Haddock docs:     http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/doc/pandoc/
Repository:       http://pandoc.googlecode.com/
Bug tracker:      http://code.google.com/p/pandoc/issues/list
Mailing list:     http://groups.google.com/group/pandoc-discuss

Some highlights of this release:

+ New GNU Texinfo writer (contributed by Peter Wang)
+ New OpenDocument XML writer (contributed by Andrea Rossato)
+ New ODT (OpenOffice document) writer
+ New MediaWiki markup writer
+ New delimited code block syntax
+ Handy generic functions for querying and transforming documents without
  lots of boilerplate (thanks to Andrea Rossato)
+ Cleaner build system:  pandoc can now be built as a regular Cabal package
+ New dependencies:  utf8-string and zip-archive
+ Code is -Wall clean
+ New Windows installer
+ Better support for math, including display math
+ Better HTML sanitizing for use in web applications
+ Many minor improvements and bug fixes (see changelog for details)

Pandoc can optionally be compiled with support for

+ syntax highlighting of delimited code blocks, using the
  highlighting-kate library (over 50 languages are supported)
  (specify -fhighlighting)
+ automatically generated citations and bibliography, using
  Andrea Rossato's hs-citeproc library (specify -fciteproc)

I am particularly excited about Rossato's experimental citation support.
It's basically a BibTeX-like system that one can use in any of pandoc's
output formats. So you can have automatically generated citations in a
blog post, a wiki page, or even a man page! It's not yet complete, but
it's far enough along for those with an adventurous spirit to use.

I am very grateful to everyone who contributed bug reports and code,
and especially to Andrea Rossato and Peter Wang for their major
contributions.

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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

Don Stewart-2
jgm:

> I'm pleased to announce the release of pandoc version 1.0.0.1.
>
> Pandoc aspires to be the swiss army knife of text markup formats: it
> can read markdown and (with some limitations) HTML, LaTeX, and
> reStructuredText, and it can write markdown, reStructuredText, HTML,
> DocBook XML, OpenDocument XML, ODT, RTF, groff man, MediaWiki markup,
> GNU Texinfo, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and S5.  Pandoc's markdown syntax includes
> extensions for LaTeX math, tables, definition lists, footnotes, and more.
>
> HackageDB:        http://hackage.haskell.org/cgi-bin/hackage-scripts/package/pandoc
> User's guide:     http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/README.html
> Examples:         http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/examples.html
> Interactive demo: http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/trypandoc/
> Haddock docs:     http://johnmacfarlane.net/pandoc/doc/pandoc/
> Repository:       http://pandoc.googlecode.com/
> Bug tracker:      http://code.google.com/p/pandoc/issues/list
> Mailing list:     http://groups.google.com/group/pandoc-discuss
>

And natively packaged for Arch Linux,

    http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?ID=19804
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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

brian-245
In reply to this post by John MacFarlane
On Sat, Sep 13, 2008 at 8:29 PM, John MacFarlane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> + Code is -Wall clean

Thanks, I appreciate it. I wish more people paid attention to this.
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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

John Goerzen-3
On Sat, Sep 13, 2008 at 09:31:50PM -0500, brian wrote:
> On Sat, Sep 13, 2008 at 8:29 PM, John MacFarlane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> > + Code is -Wall clean
>
> Thanks, I appreciate it. I wish more people paid attention to this.

Well.  I often pay attention to it.  That doesn't mean I always heed
it ;-)

Like all -Wall stuff, sometimes warnings are great and sometimes
warnings are noise.

There are two warnings that I am prone to ignore:

1) No type definition for top-level declarations

Whether or not I ignore this depends on what sort of code I'm working
on.  If I'm using Haskell as, essentially, a script language, or
writing a quick and small Parsec parser, adding a bunch of type
declarations can serve to make the code less readable and certainly
more difficult to update and maintain.  That said, for larger projects
or computation algorithms, I'd usually add declarations.

When I'm leaving off the declarations, my code sometimes winds up
looking like something vaguely resembling Python.  Sometimes time
declarations just get in the way.  Cue type inference.  One of my
favorite things about Haskell: it can be as compact as Python (or
moreso), yet detect type errors at compile time.

2) Variable x defined but not used

I most often ignore this when it occurs in a function definition.
Sometimes I may have a function that could be written

foo _ (x, _) _ = bar (x + 5)

But for clarity's sake on what all the unused args are, which really
helps for future maintainability, I'll usually use a descriptive --
but unused -- variable name.

Some of my libraries, on the other hand, are periodically validated
against -Wall -Werror.

-- John
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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

Max Bolingbroke-2
2008/9/14 John Goerzen <[hidden email]>:

> 2) Variable x defined but not used
>
> I most often ignore this when it occurs in a function definition.
> Sometimes I may have a function that could be written
>
> foo _ (x, _) _ = bar (x + 5)
>
> But for clarity's sake on what all the unused args are, which really
> helps for future maintainability, I'll usually use a descriptive --
> but unused -- variable name.

This doesn't appear to be commonly known, but actually any identifier
that /starts/ with an _ will not trigger the unused-arg warning. So if
you wrote your example like this:

foo _stuff (x, _y) _more = bar (x + 5)

It would satisfy both the compiler and your desire for descriptive
variable names.

Cheers,
Max
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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

Bugzilla from alfonso.acosta@gmail.com
In reply to this post by John MacFarlane
On Sun, Sep 14, 2008 at 3:29 AM, John MacFarlane <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Some highlights of this release:
>
> + New GNU Texinfo writer (contributed by Peter Wang)
> + New OpenDocument XML writer (contributed by Andrea Rossato)
> + New ODT (OpenOffice document) writer
> + New MediaWiki markup writer

I can't wait for a:

+ New Docbook markup reader

The reason being, I would kill for a good Docbook-to-LaTeX translator
(or a good set of Docbook-to-TeXML XSLT stylesheets):

 * Most of the opensource XSL-FO tools out there (fop, xmlroff et all)
are immature or do a poor typesetting job [1].

 * The other LaTeX-based solutions seem to be broken and/or
unmaintained (http://db2latex.sourceforge.net,
http://dblatex.sourceforge.net/ ...)

A good post on the topic:

http://uucode.com/blog/2007/02/23/general-questions-about-docbook-latex/


[1] I wanted to show how bad the PDF version of the GHC manual looks
(at least the one generated by fop), but all the PDF links from GHC's
page seem to be broken at the moment.
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Re: ANN: pandoc 1.0.0.1

Gour-3
>>>>> "Alfonso" == Alfonso Acosta <[hidden email]> writes:

Alfonso> I can't wait for a:

Alfonso> + New Docbook markup reader

Alfonso> The reason being, I would kill for a good Docbook-to-LaTeX
Alfonso> translator (or a good set of Docbook-to-TeXML XSLT
Alfonso> stylesheets):

Alfonso>  * Most of the opensource XSL-FO tools out there (fop, xmlroff
Alfonso> et all) are immature or do a poor typesetting job [1].

+ Complete reST markup reader.


Restructured text is more complete markup for serious writing, but less
complex to write in than DocBook and Pandoc's ability to generate LaTeX
& ConTeXt can generate high-quality output.


btw, I also like how Sphinx (http://sphinx.pocoo.org/) generates docs
From *.rst files.


Sincerely,
Gour


--

Gour  | Zagreb, Croatia  | GPG key: C6E7162D
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