ANNOUNCE: Haskell Communities and Activities Report (15th ed., November 2008)

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ANNOUNCE: Haskell Communities and Activities Report (15th ed., November 2008)

Janis Voigtlaender
On behalf of the many, many contributors, I am pleased to announce
that the

             Haskell Communities and Activities Report
                   (15th edition, November 2008)

                http://www.haskell.org/communities/

is now available from the Haskell Communities home page in PDF and
HTML formats.

Many thanks go to all the people that contributed to this report,
both directly, by sending in descriptions, and indirectly, by doing
all the interesting things that are reported. I hope you will find
it as interesting a read as I did.

If you have not encountered the Haskell Communities and Activities
Reports before, you may like to know that the first of these reports
was published in November 2001. Their goal is to improve the
communication between the increasingly diverse groups, projects, and
individuals working on, with, or inspired by Haskell. The idea behind
these reports is simple:

   Every six months, a call goes out to all of you enjoying Haskell to
   contribute brief summaries of your own area of work. Many of you
   respond (eagerly, unprompted, and sometimes in time for the actual
   deadline ;-) to the call. The editor collects all the contributions
   into a single report and feeds that back to the community.

When I try for the next update, six months from now, you might want
to report on your own work, project, research area or group as well.
So, please put the following into your diaries now:

           ----------------------------------------
                      End of April 2009:
           target deadline for contributions to the
           May 2009 edition of the HC&A Report
           ----------------------------------------

Unfortunately, many Haskellers working on interesting projects are so
busy with their work that they seem to have lost the time to follow
the Haskell related mailing lists and newsgroups, and have trouble even
finding time to report on their work. If you are a member, user or
friend of a project so burdened, please find someone willing to make
time to report and ask them to "register" with the editor for a simple
e-mail reminder in April (you could point me to them as well, and I can
then politely ask if they want to contribute, but it might work better
if you do the initial asking). Of course, they will still have to find
the ten to fifteen minutes to draw up their report, but maybe we can
increase our coverage of all that is going on in the community.

Feel free to circulate this announcement further in order to
reach people who might otherwise not see it. Enjoy!

Janis Voigtlaender
<hcar at haskell.org>

--
Dr. Janis Voigtlaender
http://wwwtcs.inf.tu-dresden.de/~voigt/
mailto:[hidden email]

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Re: [Haskell-cafe] ANNOUNCE: Haskell Communities and Activities Report (15th ed., November 2008)

Don Stewart-2
Good work!

It is always interesting to see the secret Haskell projects that only
get announced via the HCAR. Things not on haskell@ or on hackage.

For example, this under-the-radar project:

    http://www.haskell.org/communities/11-2008/html/report.html#sect7.7

    7.7  IVU Traffic Technologies AG Rostering Group

Haskell to solve constraints on EU bus timetables! In production use!    

-- Don


voigt:

> On behalf of the many, many contributors, I am pleased to announce
> that the
>
>             Haskell Communities and Activities Report
>                   (15th edition, November 2008)
>
>                http://www.haskell.org/communities/
>
> is now available from the Haskell Communities home page in PDF and
> HTML formats.
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Re: ANNOUNCE: Haskell Communities and Activities Report (15th ed., November 2008)

Benjamin L. Russell
In reply to this post by Janis Voigtlaender
On Fri, 28 Nov 2008 16:15:30 -0800, Don Stewart <[hidden email]>
wrote:

>Good work!
>
>It is always interesting to see the secret Haskell projects that only
>get announced via the HCAR. Things not on haskell@ or on hackage.
>
>For example, this under-the-radar project:
>
>    http://www.haskell.org/communities/11-2008/html/report.html#sect7.7
>
>    7.7  IVU Traffic Technologies AG Rostering Group
>
>Haskell to solve constraints on EU bus timetables! In production use!    

Speaking of production use, one type of project that would be
interesting would be a study examining how Haskell can increase
programmer productivity for production use for programmers who are not
necessarily gifted in programming, but whose forte may lie in another
field and who are very interested in functional programming; i.e.,
some type of tabulated data (preferably a graph, although a table
would work, too) of data quantifying how useful Haskell is in allowing
one whose forte may not necessarily be in programming (say, a
physicist, mathematician, or even a translator who happens to have an
algorithmically-focused computer science degree) to equal or excel the
productivity of, say, a gifted C/C++ programmer in, say, setting up a
commercial Web site.

The reason is that recently, there has been news of people in academia
leaving for other realms because of worsening conditions (see "As
strikes begin, lecturer quits to become plumber" at
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2004/feb/24/lecturerspay.highereducation,
and "Why I am Not a Professor OR The Decline and Fall of the British
University" at http://www.lambdassociates.org/blog/decline.htm).  Up
to know, my dream was to publish a paper on type theory to motivate
study of Haskell, but now it looks like I may need to aim for creating
a commercial Web site.  However, I am not sure of being able to
compete with commercial Web sites, because I am more of a
writer/translator who happens to like functional programming than a
real-life programmer.

I've already seen such articles as "Why Functional Programming
Matters" (see http://www.md.chalmers.se/~rjmh/Papers/whyfp.html), "Why
Haskell Matters" (see
http://www.haskell.org/haskellwiki/Why_Haskell_matters), and "Beating
the Averages" (see http://www.paulgraham.com/avg.html).  However,
these essays tend to focus on how a functional language FL is
structurally better than non-functional languages NFL in general,
without specifying the skill-level of the programmer.  Instead, it
would be interesting to find the minimum skill-level s necessary for,
say, somebody whose forte is not in programming, but who, say, studies
functional programming as a hobby, to use Haskell as a tool in
achieving a productivity level equivalent to that of a gifted C/C++
programmer.

To sum:  Can a theoretically-minded Haskell student who studies
Haskell out of interest in type theory compete with star C/C++
programmers in developing, say, commercial Web sites?

This is not quite clear, because even if Haskell can increase
programmer productivity by tenfold, a star programmer can also be more
productive than an average programmer by tenfold.

How risky is this challenge?

-- Benjamin L. Russell

>
>-- Don
>
>
>voigt:
>> On behalf of the many, many contributors, I am pleased to announce
>> that the
>>
>>             Haskell Communities and Activities Report
>>                   (15th edition, November 2008)
>>
>>                http://www.haskell.org/communities/
>>
>> is now available from the Haskell Communities home page in PDF and
>> HTML formats.
--
Benjamin L. Russell  /   DekuDekuplex at Yahoo dot com
http://dekudekuplex.wordpress.com/
Translator/Interpreter / Mobile:  +011 81 80-3603-6725
"Furuike ya, kawazu tobikomu mizu no oto."
-- Matsuo Basho^