Amanda

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
4 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Amanda

Christiaan Kras
Hello list,

First time I'm posting here. I've been interested in Haskell for about a
year now, but sadly haven't done too much with it yet.

I decided to get my bachelors degree in Computer Science/Engineering
(it's a bit of a mixed course at my university) after having worked for
over 4.5 years. One of the classes I've got to follow is discrete math.

A first glimpse on the study material made me think "Cool! They're using
Haskell!". This is however not the case. Instead, we're using Amanda.

Amanda was written by Dick Bruin, who as far as I know used to teach at
my university, but has now moved on to another university. I was told
Amanda was being used at my university, NHL Leeuwarden (Netherlands) and
the University of Twente (Netherlands). (strictly my university isn't a
university, but high school means something different in English than it
does in Dutch :-))

The reason I'm posting here is because Amanda seems extremely heavily
influenced by Haskell. I think it was written in either Delphi or
Pascal, but I've got to verify that with one of the teachers.

It's quite old as well, as it was developed between 1990 and 2000.

A lot of stuff written in Amanda can easily be converted to Haskell with
a few small changes. Which makes me wonder why they aren't using Haskell
now. List comprehensions use the same syntax, but use a semicolon
instead of a comma for separating generators and terms. Operators such
as +,/,* etc. are functions, just like they are in Haskell. For what I
can tell Amanda is more or less a stripped down version of Haskell.

The thing I was wondering though, is if anyone on this list has ever
heard of Amanda before. If so, where did you got in contact with it?

--
Christiaan Kras
http://blog.htbaa.com


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Amanda

Peter Hall

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Amanda

Christiaan Kras
As far as I know Amanda is closed source as well.

 From the Miranda Wikipedia page I found this link to Amanda (where you
can download it) http://www.cs.ucl.ac.uk/teaching/3C11/amanda.html

Thanks for the link. Will definitely read it.

Op 30-12-2011 1:08, Peter Hall schreef:

>  From what gather, Amanda is a clone of Miranda - presumably created
> because Miranda is a closed-source product. Haskell draws heavily from
> Miranda, and some smaller programs can look almost indistinguishable
> in the two languages.
>
> That said, Miranda/Amanda really aren't as sophisticated as Haskell,
> lacking type classes in particular.
>
> Here is a paper comparing Haskell with Miranda:
> http://www.cs.mun.ca/~donald/techreports/2000-02-cmp_haskell_miranda.ps
> It's a little bit outdated but covers the main differences pretty well.
>
> Peter
>
>
> On Thu, Dec 29, 2011 at 11:17 PM, Christiaan Kras<c.kras at pcc-online.net>  wrote:
>> Hello list,
>>
>> First time I'm posting here. I've been interested in Haskell for about a
>> year now, but sadly haven't done too much with it yet.
>>
>> I decided to get my bachelors degree in Computer Science/Engineering (it's a
>> bit of a mixed course at my university) after having worked for over 4.5
>> years. One of the classes I've got to follow is discrete math.
>>
>> A first glimpse on the study material made me think "Cool! They're using
>> Haskell!". This is however not the case. Instead, we're using Amanda.
>>
>> Amanda was written by Dick Bruin, who as far as I know used to teach at my
>> university, but has now moved on to another university. I was told Amanda
>> was being used at my university, NHL Leeuwarden (Netherlands) and the
>> University of Twente (Netherlands). (strictly my university isn't a
>> university, but high school means something different in English than it
>> does in Dutch :-))
>>
>> The reason I'm posting here is because Amanda seems extremely heavily
>> influenced by Haskell. I think it was written in either Delphi or Pascal,
>> but I've got to verify that with one of the teachers.
>>
>> It's quite old as well, as it was developed between 1990 and 2000.
>>
>> A lot of stuff written in Amanda can easily be converted to Haskell with a
>> few small changes. Which makes me wonder why they aren't using Haskell now.
>> List comprehensions use the same syntax, but use a semicolon instead of a
>> comma for separating generators and terms. Operators such as +,/,* etc. are
>> functions, just like they are in Haskell. For what I can tell Amanda is more
>> or less a stripped down version of Haskell.
>>
>> The thing I was wondering though, is if anyone on this list has ever heard
>> of Amanda before. If so, where did you got in contact with it?
>>
>> --
>> Christiaan Kras
>> http://blog.htbaa.com
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Beginners mailing list
>> Beginners at haskell.org
>> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners


--
Christiaan Kras
http://blog.htbaa.com


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Amanda

Chaddaï Fouché
In reply to this post by Peter Hall
On Fri, Dec 30, 2011 at 1:08 AM, Peter Hall <peter.hall at memorphic.com> wrote:
>
> That said, Miranda/Amanda really aren't as sophisticated as Haskell,
> lacking type classes in particular.
>
> Here is a paper comparing Haskell with Miranda:
> http://www.cs.mun.ca/~donald/techreports/2000-02-cmp_haskell_miranda.ps
> It's a little bit outdated but covers the main differences pretty well.
>

Much of this report is still valuable but of course the part directly
concerning Hugs behaviour are increasingly irrelevant since GHCi is
now the interpreter of choice, having long since outstripped Hugs in
almost every point : performance, user-friendly interface, quality of
the error messages, and so on... So a large part of Haskell
"disadvantages" are now nullified, the only remaining interest of
Miranda being probably its less complicated type system, for
educational purposes (though using a simplified Prelude without
typeclasses would be at least as good).

--
Jeda?