Book Suggestion

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Book Suggestion

Chad Wilson
Have any of you fellow n00bs ordered a book on Haskell?  Or are you
just using the haskell.org web site?  I think I need to get me a book
to keep as a reference.

--
Chad Wilson
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Book Suggestion

Angelos Sphyris
Chad, hi.

Regarding an actual book, I have come across an interesting one called "Real World Haskell", which is currently in the making, but should reach booksellers before the end of this year. The authors maintain a web site (http://www.realworldhaskell.org), which is actually a blog about the book. They even give links for pre-ordering the book from Amazon and others.

If you also look at http://book.realworldhaskell.org/, you will see that draft versions of chapters are posted on the Internet for people to read them and make comments.

Until now, I have used the tutorial material on the site, but I would be interested in getting hold of a copy of this book when it is finally published.

-- Angelos



----- Original Message -----
From: "Chad Wilson" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, July 17, 2008 9:31 PM
Subject: Book Suggestion


> Have any of you fellow n00bs ordered a book on Haskell?  Or are you
> just using the haskell.org web site?  I think I need to get me a book
> to keep as a reference.
>
> --
> Chad Wilson
> _______________________________________________
> Beginners mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/beginners
>
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Book Suggestion

James Britt-2
In reply to this post by Chad Wilson
Chad Wilson wrote:
 > Have any of you fellow n00bs ordered a book on Haskell?  Or are you
 > just using the haskell.org web site?  I think I need to get me a book
 > to keep as a reference.

I've a few.

Introduction to Functional Programming Systems Using Haskell
ISBN-10: 0521277248


Programming in Haskell
ISBN-10: 0521692695


The Haskell School of Expression: Learning Functional Programming
through Multimedia
ISBN-10: 0521644089


I find the first to be about the best of the three.  I thought The
School of Expression did a poor job of explaining how to actually edit
and run code; the layout and typography does not make it clear enough to
me when something is meant as an abstract code snippet, and when it's
code you could (or should) plausibly run.

On the Web, I really liked "Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours" if only
because it shows how to edit and run actual code right for the start,
and code that will read and write to and from the command line.  (Seems
many tutorials and books spend forever explaining types and and other
abstractions while not giving test code to run and poke and break and
fix. )   I learn best when I have sample code I can experiment with; it
makes the understanding and application of the abstractions easier to
grasp and apply.

http://halogen.note.amherst.edu/~jdtang/scheme_in_48/tutorial/overview.html


And from what I've read of Real World Haskell it looks like it should be
quite good.


http://book.realworldhaskell.org.nyud.net/beta/


James


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[Haskell-begin] Re: Book Suggestion

James Britt-3
In reply to this post by Chad Wilson
Chad Wilson wrote:
 > Have any of you fellow n00bs ordered a book on Haskell?  Or are you
 > just using the haskell.org web site?  I think I need to get me a book
 > to keep as a reference.

I've a few.

Introduction to Functional Programming Systems Using Haskell
ISBN-10: 0521277248


Programming in Haskell
ISBN-10: 0521692695


The Haskell School of Expression: Learning Functional Programming
through Multimedia
ISBN-10: 0521644089


I find the first to be about the best of the three.  I thought the The
School of Expression did a poor job of explaining how to actually edit
and run code; the layout and typography does not make it clear enough to
me when something is meant as an abstract code snippet, and when it's
code you could (or should) plausibly run.

I really liked "Write Yourself a Scheme in 48 Hours" if only because it
shows how to edit and run actual code right for the start, and code that
will read and write to and from the command line.  (Seems many tutorials
and books spend forever explaining types and and other abstractions
while not giving test code to run and poke and break and fix. )   I
learn best when I have sample code I can experiment with; it makes the
understanding and application of the abstractions easier to grasp and apply.

http://halogen.note.amherst.edu/~jdtang/scheme_in_48/tutorial/overview.html


And from what I've read of Real World Haskell it looks like it should be
quite good


http://book.realworldhaskell.org.nyud.net/beta/


James