Gitter Haskell Community

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Gitter Haskell Community

Ben Spencer

Hello all,


We have a small group of Haskellers over in our Gitter community chat. If you're inclined, come check us out at https://gitter.im/haskell-chat/Lobby.


We have about 40 Haskell enthusiasts so far!


Why Gitter you might ask? Gitter was designed for open communities. It's free for unlimited users and you get full access to your chat history. And you only need your Github account to sign up. Plus if we generate enough activity, Gitter will feature Haskell as a suggested community!


Best,


Ben


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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Will Yager
What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.

I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.

The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.

Will

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Why Gitter you might ask? 


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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Tomas Carnecky
Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to connect to the server and...

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.

I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.

The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.

Will

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Why Gitter you might ask? 

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Christopher Allen
For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
now.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
> point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
> connect to the server and...
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
>> very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.
>>
>> I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
>> is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
>> they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
>> an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
>> up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.
>>
>> The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
>> with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.
>>
>> Will
>>
>> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Why Gitter you might ask?
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
>> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.



--
Chris Allen
Currently working on http://haskellbook.com
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Brandon Allbery
In reply to this post by Tomas Carnecky

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 4:50 PM, Tomas Carnecky <[hidden email]> wrote:
Usability matters

Only for some people, apparently. A web-only interface is not positive usability for some of us.


--
brandon s allbery kf8nh                               sine nomine associates
[hidden email]                                  [hidden email]
unix, openafs, kerberos, infrastructure, xmonad        http://sinenomine.net

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Justin Wood
In reply to this post by Christopher Allen
It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and point them at a URL

You could always point someone to https://webchat.freenode.net/ or any other web based IRC client.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 11:51 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:
For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
now.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
> point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
> connect to the server and...
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
>> very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.
>>
>> I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
>> is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
>> they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
>> an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
>> up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.
>>
>> The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
>> with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.
>>
>> Will
>>
>> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Why Gitter you might ask?
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
>> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.



--
Chris Allen
Currently working on http://haskellbook.com
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Ben Spencer
In reply to this post by Ben Spencer
Hey Chris,

As I've mentioned Slack isn't a good choice for open communities. It's really designed for businesses.

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:52 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:

For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
now.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
<[hidden email]> wrote:
Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
connect to the server and...

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:

What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.

I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.

The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.

Will

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
wrote:

Why Gitter you might ask?

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--
Chris Allen
Currently working on http://haskellbook.com

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Ben Spencer
In reply to this post by Ben Spencer
Hello Tomas,

I agree usability does matter. 

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:55 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hello Tomas,

I agree usability does matter. 

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:51 AM, Tomas Carnecky <[hidden email]> wrote:

Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to connect to the server and...

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.

I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.

The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.

Will

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Why Gitter you might ask? 


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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Ben Spencer
In reply to this post by Ben Spencer
Hey William,

I'll speak from my experience.

I've noticed that the developers I work with (mostly younger developers) have embraced tech like Github, Slack, and Gitter. When I first tried Slack I didn't like it much but now I understand the appeal.

I remember trying IRC a long time ago. It seemed to work for the time but for whatever reason I didn't take to it.

This part is my opinion, but if a community like Haskell wants to gain wider appeal we have to meet new people where they are at.

Most people know about Github and like Github. A solution like Gitter integrates nicely. Slack isn't a good option because it's designed for businesses in mind. The chat history is limited and you have to pay for extra features.

IRC is a bit aged. It doesn't make it bad but newer developers are interested in the new shiny technology. I've also seen a few posts that in order to get it to work well (ie having a chat history) you have to have a hosted service. That's overhead I rather not have. 

But more importantly, we should meet the community where they're at and that's on Github.

Best,

Ben Spencer

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:41 AM, William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:

What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.

I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.

The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.

Will

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

Why Gitter you might ask? 


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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Michael Walker
In reply to this post by Ben Spencer
The Haskell slack seems to be working well, so regardless of the
suitability of slack to open communities or not, I don't really see
the advantage of fragmenting the community even further. Why would
someone pick gitter over the two existing platforms that have
thousands of users? They would be intentionally limiting the help they
can get.

On 7 December 2016 at 17:07, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Hey Chris,
>
> As I've mentioned Slack isn't a good choice for open communities. It's
> really designed for businesses.
>
> On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:52 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
> community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
> now.
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
>
> point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
>
> connect to the server and...
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
>
> very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.
>
>
> I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
>
> is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
>
> they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
>
> an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
>
> up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.
>
>
> The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
>
> with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.
>
>
> Will
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
>
> wrote:
>
>
> Why Gitter you might ask?
>
>
> _______________________________________________
>
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
>
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
>
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
>
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
>
>
>
>
> --
> Chris Allen
> Currently working on http://haskellbook.com
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.



--
Michael Walker (http://www.barrucadu.co.uk)
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Justin Wood
In reply to this post by Justin Wood
Ben,

Please make sure that you use reply all in the future so that the message does not go just to me.

For everyone else on the list, this was the message

That comes back to usability. The client functions but it is not appealing. Personal taste, I suppose.

I agree that freenode webchat is not the most appealing piece of software, but there are plenty of web based IRC clients. I'm sure there are some that are appealing.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 11:56 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:
That comes back to usability. The client functions but it is not appealing. Personal taste, I suppose.

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:55 AM, Justin Wood <[hidden email]> wrote:

It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and point them at a URL

You could always point someone to https://webchat.freenode.net/ or any other web based IRC client.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 11:51 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:
For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
now.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
<[hidden email]> wrote:
> Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
> point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
> connect to the server and...
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
>> very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.
>>
>> I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
>> is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
>> they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
>> an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
>> up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.
>>
>> The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
>> with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.
>>
>> Will
>>
>> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> Why Gitter you might ask?
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
>> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
> http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
> Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.



--
Chris Allen
Currently working on http://haskellbook.com
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Ben Spencer
In reply to this post by Ben Spencer
I think it's important to recognize that users have different tastes and needs.

Additionally, Gitter allows you to view the chat channel if you wish. It's also something that's publicly viewable and searchable from Gitter explore. It doesn't require the odd signup process that Slack has implemented. I can actually see my chat history for more than 2 days!

But beyond that if you like Slack and its community then more power to you. We can certainly have a difference of opinion and preferences.

-Ben

On Dec 07, 2016, at 12:09 PM, Michael Walker <[hidden email]> wrote:

The Haskell slack seems to be working well, so regardless of the
suitability of slack to open communities or not, I don't really see
the advantage of fragmenting the community even further. Why would
someone pick gitter over the two existing platforms that have
thousands of users? They would be intentionally limiting the help they
can get.

On 7 December 2016 at 17:07, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hey Chris,

As I've mentioned Slack isn't a good choice for open communities. It's
really designed for businesses.

On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:52 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:

For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
now.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
<[hidden email]> wrote:

Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and

point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to

connect to the server and...


On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:


What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's

very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.


I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC

is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding

they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill

an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built

up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.


The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better

with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.


Will


On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>

wrote:


Why Gitter you might ask?


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_______________________________________________

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--
Chris Allen
Currently working on http://haskellbook.com


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--
Michael Walker (http://www.barrucadu.co.uk)

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Mihai Maruseac
Problem is not in having different preferences but in splitting the
community even further. That is something we should avoid.

/me goes and investigates if a bot who will duplicate lines in
#irc/slack/gitter to the other 2 channels is a good investment.

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 9:14 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I think it's important to recognize that users have different tastes and
> needs.
>
> Additionally, Gitter allows you to view the chat channel if you wish. It's
> also something that's publicly viewable and searchable from Gitter explore.
> It doesn't require the odd signup process that Slack has implemented. I can
> actually see my chat history for more than 2 days!
>
> But beyond that if you like Slack and its community then more power to you.
> We can certainly have a difference of opinion and preferences.
>
> -Ben
>
> On Dec 07, 2016, at 12:09 PM, Michael Walker <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> The Haskell slack seems to be working well, so regardless of the
> suitability of slack to open communities or not, I don't really see
> the advantage of fragmenting the community even further. Why would
> someone pick gitter over the two existing platforms that have
> thousands of users? They would be intentionally limiting the help they
> can get.
>
> On 7 December 2016 at 17:07, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Hey Chris,
>
>
> As I've mentioned Slack isn't a good choice for open communities. It's
>
> really designed for businesses.
>
>
> On Dec 07, 2016, at 11:52 AM, Christopher Allen <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> For that, there's http://fpchat.com/ which is an established Slack
>
> community. The #haskell channel alone has 1,208 people in it right
>
> now.
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 10:50 AM, Tomas Carnecky
>
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
> Usability matters. It's easier to tell people to open a browser window and
>
>
> point them at a URL than tell them to download an IRC chat client and how to
>
>
> connect to the server and...
>
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 5:41 PM William Yager <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>
>
> What are the advantages of this over the #haskell IRC on freenode? It's
>
>
> very active, usually with over 1500 nicks at any given time.
>
>
>
> I generally prefer IRC to any of these hip web chat solutions because IRC
>
>
> is client-agnostic and very rugged against companies folding or deciding
>
>
> they don't want to host a project any more. Basically the only way to kill
>
>
> an IRC channel is through social attrition, whereas any social value built
>
>
> up in hosted chat services might disappear overnight.
>
>
>
> The one major advantage of hosted chats over IRC is that they work better
>
>
> with mobile users, but I don't think that's very relevant for haskell dev.
>
>
>
> Will
>
>
>
> On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:34 AM, Ben Spencer <[hidden email]>
>
>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> Why Gitter you might ask?
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
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>
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>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
>
>
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
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>
>
>
>
> --
>
> Chris Allen
>
> Currently working on http://haskellbook.com
>
>
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--
Mihai Maruseac (MM)
"If you can't solve a problem, then there's an easier problem you can
solve: find it." -- George Polya
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Brandon Allbery

On Wed, Dec 7, 2016 at 7:02 PM, Mihai Maruseac <[hidden email]> wrote:
/me goes and investigates if a bot who will duplicate lines in
#irc/slack/gitter to the other 2 channels is a good investment.

Duplicating stuff between communities with >1000 participants can be asking for pain. #haskell already decided against such a link with the Slack community (or rather, such a link exists but by specific request it only forwards from IRC to Slack).

--
brandon s allbery kf8nh                               sine nomine associates
[hidden email]                                  [hidden email]
unix, openafs, kerberos, infrastructure, xmonad        http://sinenomine.net

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Mihai Maruseac
>>
>> /me goes and investigates if a bot who will duplicate lines in
>> #irc/slack/gitter to the other 2 channels is a good investment.
>
>
> Duplicating stuff between communities with >1000 participants can be asking
> for pain. #haskell already decided against such a link with the Slack
> community (or rather, such a link exists but by specific request it only
> forwards from IRC to Slack).

Investigation closed. Thanks :)
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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Geraldus
From my point of view all mentioned solutions aren't perfect:

+ with IRC I always lose the history, also, my client (Lingo on OS X) always disconnects and I can lose answers really easy too
+ I tried Slack in the past, and found no advantages or something that buys me
+ Gitter is quite buggy for now

However my personal preference is Gitter, because it give history, edit abilities and nice code appearance for free (though I wish to see light theme for code highlighter as GitHub provides by default).

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Alexander Kjeldaas
I agree.

While I've used IRC for almost 20 years, it just isn't as usable as the newer tools.
- IRC assumes a permanently connected computer, which again requires a VPS as indirection.  I do use that, but there are clear usability issues here.
- IRC further assumes that I will be on one device only.  Again I solve this by jumping through a VPS.  It's a design flow though.
- Slack is great, but enterprise (login ++).
- Gitter is just "yet another tool", might be the best thing, but it just hasn't got the mindshare yet.


A technical solution where freenode's #haskell is bridged to one of the new fancy web UIs, where history is kept, and multiple devices can be used, would be great.  I'm not sure if anyone is doing that though.

Alexander

On Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 9:44 AM, Geraldus <[hidden email]> wrote:
From my point of view all mentioned solutions aren't perfect:

+ with IRC I always lose the history, also, my client (Lingo on OS X) always disconnects and I can lose answers really easy too
+ I tried Slack in the past, and found no advantages or something that buys me
+ Gitter is quite buggy for now

However my personal preference is Gitter, because it give history, edit abilities and nice code appearance for free (though I wish to see light theme for code highlighter as GitHub provides by default).

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Oliver Charles-3
Does this really have to be all or nothing? It's just chat, something I consider fairly ephemeral anyway. I'd much rather people talk about Haskell as much as possible, even if that comes at the expensive of having one blessed channel/medium.

On Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 11:02 AM Alexander Kjeldaas <[hidden email]> wrote:
I agree.

While I've used IRC for almost 20 years, it just isn't as usable as the newer tools.
- IRC assumes a permanently connected computer, which again requires a VPS as indirection.  I do use that, but there are clear usability issues here.
- IRC further assumes that I will be on one device only.  Again I solve this by jumping through a VPS.  It's a design flow though.
- Slack is great, but enterprise (login ++).
- Gitter is just "yet another tool", might be the best thing, but it just hasn't got the mindshare yet.


A technical solution where freenode's #haskell is bridged to one of the new fancy web UIs, where history is kept, and multiple devices can be used, would be great.  I'm not sure if anyone is doing that though.

Alexander


On Thu, Dec 8, 2016 at 9:44 AM, Geraldus <[hidden email]> wrote:
From my point of view all mentioned solutions aren't perfect:

+ with IRC I always lose the history, also, my client (Lingo on OS X) always disconnects and I can lose answers really easy too
+ I tried Slack in the past, and found no advantages or something that buys me
+ Gitter is quite buggy for now

However my personal preference is Gitter, because it give history, edit abilities and nice code appearance for free (though I wish to see light theme for code highlighter as GitHub provides by default).

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Geraldus
Does this really have to be all or nothing? It's just chat, something I consider fairly ephemeral anyway. I'd much rather people talk about Haskell as much as possible, even if that comes at the expensive of having one blessed channel/medium.

+1 

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Re: Gitter Haskell Community

Alberto G. Corona
Slack and Gitter are necessary steps for the final goal: The rediscovery of google wave. 

I would like to link to specific comments in the code, execute bots and collaborative editing, But is more usable than IRC.

2016-12-08 14:16 GMT+01:00 Geraldus <[hidden email]>:
Does this really have to be all or nothing? It's just chat, something I consider fairly ephemeral anyway. I'd much rather people talk about Haskell as much as possible, even if that comes at the expensive of having one blessed channel/medium.

+1 

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