Haskell and Stack success stories

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Haskell and Stack success stories

Michael Snoyman
It would be great to have some success stories for Stack for promotional material (like a future Stack homepage, talks on Haskell, or in the Stack repo itself). While different people could have different goals with such stories, my purpose is to show the power of the Haskell toolchain relative to other languages. Based on that, talking about the strengths of Stack, Haskell, GHC, and the Haskell package ecosystem would all be relevant.

Success stories could be from success in a commercial setting, hobbyist, personal project, etc. The point is: demonstrate to people outside of the Haskell community that Haskell is a great choice for creating software.

If anyone is interested in providing such stories, please let me know. Anything from a short one-liner to a longer exposition would be welcome.

And it probably goes without saying, but since I'm planning on using this in public places, please be sure you're OK being quoted publicly with whatever you're saying.

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Re: Haskell and Stack success stories

Greg Weber

On Wed, Sep 30, 2015 at 1:51 AM, Michael Snoyman <[hidden email]> wrote:
It would be great to have some success stories for Stack for promotional material (like a future Stack homepage, talks on Haskell, or in the Stack repo itself). While different people could have different goals with such stories, my purpose is to show the power of the Haskell toolchain relative to other languages. Based on that, talking about the strengths of Stack, Haskell, GHC, and the Haskell package ecosystem would all be relevant.

Success stories could be from success in a commercial setting, hobbyist, personal project, etc. The point is: demonstrate to people outside of the Haskell community that Haskell is a great choice for creating software.

If anyone is interested in providing such stories, please let me know. Anything from a short one-liner to a longer exposition would be welcome.

And it probably goes without saying, but since I'm planning on using this in public places, please be sure you're OK being quoted publicly with whatever you're saying.

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Re: Haskell and Stack success stories

Yann Esposito
In reply to this post by Michael Snoyman
We use Haskell in production to retrieve thousands of tweets per seconds in real time.
Before we used PHP and it couldn't handle more than about 15 tweets per seconds.
Haskell was really the best tool for the job.

Actually we have four different demons written in Haskell.
During a long time they weren't compiled and testes on our CI because our sys/admin couldn't compile them easily.
He lost a lot of time trying without success.

When stack came out, it took no more than 2 hours to make the building script for all our Haskell based tools.
Now we build on VM where most of the lib we use are already compiled so it takes less than 2 minutes between a push and the code being run on our servers.

We also use Clojure a lot with my co-workers. But it really lacked a "lein" tool for Haskell. Now I can say that stack is exactly what lacked to convince more people to try Haskell. And I personally find stack a better tool for Haskell than lein is for Clojure.

Thanks for stack, it is great!

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Re: Haskell and Stack success stories

Bryan Richter
Aaron Wolf wrote a narrative about Snowdrift's technical history that includes a section, "Stack to the rescue". The article isn't exactly focused on stack, but I think it offers a nice perspective on working on a large Haskell project from someone who came from a non-technical background.


On Wed, Sep 30, 2015 at 7:11 AM, Yann Esposito <[hidden email]> wrote:
We use Haskell in production to retrieve thousands of tweets per seconds in real time.
Before we used PHP and it couldn't handle more than about 15 tweets per seconds.
Haskell was really the best tool for the job.

Actually we have four different demons written in Haskell.
During a long time they weren't compiled and testes on our CI because our sys/admin couldn't compile them easily.
He lost a lot of time trying without success.

When stack came out, it took no more than 2 hours to make the building script for all our Haskell based tools.
Now we build on VM where most of the lib we use are already compiled so it takes less than 2 minutes between a push and the code being run on our servers.

We also use Clojure a lot with my co-workers. But it really lacked a "lein" tool for Haskell. Now I can say that stack is exactly what lacked to convince more people to try Haskell. And I personally find stack a better tool for Haskell than lein is for Clojure.

Thanks for stack, it is great!

--

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Re: Haskell and Stack success stories

Alexander Lippling
In reply to this post by Michael Snoyman
Hi Michael,

We built the backend services for the iOS App LottoTime24 (https://itunes.apple.com/app/id915831094?mt=8) for one of our customers. The backend is an admin interface and an API for the app that was developed entirely using Yesod. One of the main tasks is the automation and delivery of Apple Push Notifications to the users.

The project started in 2014 and we had to use Cabal because Stack was not released to the public yet. We built the application within Docker so that our devs could work within the same environment as it would be run in production. As a result, we ended up with several hand-crafted bash scripts to support the whole process.

We switched the whole build process to Stack in August 2015. We were able to get rid of direct Cabal usage (including sandboxes and add-source) and hand-crafted bash scripts. The builds are much faster. It is a joy to be able to run "stack build" on a machine where Haskell is not installed: "it just works".

We really appreciate the development of Stack as it solves many problems, in particular for Haskell starters.

- Alexander

--

Alexander Lippling


hotwirestudios
Lippling & Mücke GbR
Technologiezentrum
Herbert-Wehner-Str. 2
59174 Kamen
Germany



On Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 10:51:46 AM UTC+2, Michael Snoyman wrote:
It would be great to have some success stories for Stack for promotional material (like a future Stack homepage, talks on Haskell, or in the Stack repo itself). While different people could have different goals with such stories, my purpose is to show the power of the Haskell toolchain relative to other languages. Based on that, talking about the strengths of Stack, Haskell, GHC, and the Haskell package ecosystem would all be relevant.

Success stories could be from success in a commercial setting, hobbyist, personal project, etc. The point is: demonstrate to people outside of the Haskell community that Haskell is a great choice for creating software.

If anyone is interested in providing such stories, please let me know. Anything from a short one-liner to a longer exposition would be welcome.

And it probably goes without saying, but since I'm planning on using this in public places, please be sure you're OK being quoted publicly with whatever you're saying.

--
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Re: Haskell and Stack success stories

Michael Snoyman
Thanks everyone for the feedback!

On Thu, Oct 1, 2015 at 4:25 PM Alexander Lippling <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Michael,

We built the backend services for the iOS App LottoTime24 (https://itunes.apple.com/app/id915831094?mt=8) for one of our customers. The backend is an admin interface and an API for the app that was developed entirely using Yesod. One of the main tasks is the automation and delivery of Apple Push Notifications to the users.

The project started in 2014 and we had to use Cabal because Stack was not released to the public yet. We built the application within Docker so that our devs could work within the same environment as it would be run in production. As a result, we ended up with several hand-crafted bash scripts to support the whole process.

We switched the whole build process to Stack in August 2015. We were able to get rid of direct Cabal usage (including sandboxes and add-source) and hand-crafted bash scripts. The builds are much faster. It is a joy to be able to run "stack build" on a machine where Haskell is not installed: "it just works".

We really appreciate the development of Stack as it solves many problems, in particular for Haskell starters.

- Alexander

--

Alexander Lippling


hotwirestudios
Lippling & Mücke GbR
Technologiezentrum
Herbert-Wehner-Str. 2
59174 Kamen
Germany



On Wednesday, September 30, 2015 at 10:51:46 AM UTC+2, Michael Snoyman wrote:
It would be great to have some success stories for Stack for promotional material (like a future Stack homepage, talks on Haskell, or in the Stack repo itself). While different people could have different goals with such stories, my purpose is to show the power of the Haskell toolchain relative to other languages. Based on that, talking about the strengths of Stack, Haskell, GHC, and the Haskell package ecosystem would all be relevant.

Success stories could be from success in a commercial setting, hobbyist, personal project, etc. The point is: demonstrate to people outside of the Haskell community that Haskell is a great choice for creating software.

If anyone is interested in providing such stories, please let me know. Anything from a short one-liner to a longer exposition would be welcome.

And it probably goes without saying, but since I'm planning on using this in public places, please be sure you're OK being quoted publicly with whatever you're saying.

--

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