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Health effects

Andrew Coppin
The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of
those ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded to
recursively subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and then eat
the individual squares in depth-first order. It was only after getting
through 16 of the things that I stopped to notice that the whole bar
just happens to have an exact power of two squares on it.

And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself "...woah,
maybe do too much Haskell?" o_O

Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have
something wrong with me...

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Re: Health effects

Gianfranco Alongi
Maybe I haven't done enough haskell, but enough lisp to NOT eat _2_ Kg
of chocolate.
Did you really think you would get those 2 Kg's down?

/Gf

On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 9:43 PM, Andrew Coppin
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of those
> ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded to recursively
> subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and then eat the individual
> squares in depth-first order. It was only after getting through 16 of the
> things that I stopped to notice that the whole bar just happens to have an
> exact power of two squares on it.
>
> And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself "...woah, maybe
> do too much Haskell?" o_O
>
> Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have something
> wrong with me...
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>



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Re: Health effects

Andrew Coppin
Gianfranco Alongi wrote:
> Maybe I haven't done enough haskell, but enough lisp to NOT eat _2_ Kg
> of chocolate.
> Did you really think you would get those 2 Kg's down?
>  

Oh, no. The entire bar is 2 Kg, I wasn't actually planning to eat the
whole thing! o_O My god, my pancreas would explode or something...

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Re: Health effects

Anton van Straaten
In reply to this post by Andrew Coppin
Andrew Coppin wrote:

> The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of
> those ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded to
> recursively subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and then eat
> the individual squares in depth-first order. It was only after getting
> through 16 of the things that I stopped to notice that the whole bar
> just happens to have an exact power of two squares on it.
>
> And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself "...woah,
> maybe do too much Haskell?" o_O
>
> Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have
> something wrong with me...

You're not alone:

   http://xkcd.com/245/

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Re: Health effects

Jason Dagit-2
In reply to this post by Andrew Coppin


On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 12:43 PM, Andrew Coppin <[hidden email]> wrote:
The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of those ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded to recursively subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and then eat the individual squares in depth-first order. It was only after getting through 16 of the things that I stopped to notice that the whole bar just happens to have an exact power of two squares on it.

And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself "...woah, maybe do too much Haskell?" o_O

Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have something wrong with me...

You may have applied divide and conquer but I suspect your updates were destructive.  Are you sure it's too much Haskell that is the problem? :-)

Jason

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Re: Health effects

Gianfranco Alongi
In reply to this post by Andrew Coppin
Oh, yeah, I thought you really meant that you would force that "baby" down. :)
Nice to hear that you wouldn't. Not even "lazy evaluation" would save
you there 7-8 hours later.

;)

/Gf

On Mon, Sep 29, 2008 at 10:00 PM, Andrew Coppin
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Gianfranco Alongi wrote:
>>
>> Maybe I haven't done enough haskell, but enough lisp to NOT eat _2_ Kg
>> of chocolate.
>> Did you really think you would get those 2 Kg's down?
>>
>
> Oh, no. The entire bar is 2 Kg, I wasn't actually planning to eat the whole
> thing! o_O My god, my pancreas would explode or something...
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>



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Re: Health effects

Andrew Coppin
In reply to this post by Anton van Straaten
Anton van Straaten wrote:
> You're not alone:
>
>   http://xkcd.com/245/

Heh. Randel appears to have not heard of Haskell. He thinks _Lisp_ is
the ultimate language. ;-)

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Re: Health effects

Alex Queiroz-2
Hallo,

Andrew Coppin wrote:
> Anton van Straaten wrote:
>> You're not alone:
>>
>>   http://xkcd.com/245/
>
> Heh. Randel appears to have not heard of Haskell. He thinks _Lisp_ is
> the ultimate language. ;-)
>

     Well, at least he's close, let's wait till he finds out about
Scheme. :-)

Cheers,
-alex
http://www.ventonegro.org/
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Re: Health effects

Simon Brenner
In reply to this post by Gianfranco Alongi
On 9/29/08, Gianfranco Alongi <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Oh, yeah, I thought you really meant that you would force that "baby" down. :)
>  Nice to hear that you wouldn't. Not even "lazy evaluation" would save
>  you there 7-8 hours later.

2kg of chocolate 'thunks' to 'force' really might 'blow your stack' later on.

Harr Harr :D
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Re: Health effects

Heinrich Apfelmus
In reply to this post by Andrew Coppin
Andrew Coppin wrote:

> The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of
> those ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded to
> recursively subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and then eat
> the individual squares in depth-first order. It was only after getting
> through 16 of the things that I stopped to notice that the whole bar
> just happens to have an exact power of two squares on it.
>
> And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself "...woah,
> maybe do too much Haskell?" o_O
>
> Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have
> something wrong with me...

A much more important question is: how many "break bar in two"
operations did you perform? Can you do it with less?


Regards,
apfelmus

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Re: Health effects

Adrian Neumann
In reply to this post by Andrew Coppin
I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n pieces.  
You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts by cutting a grid.  
But I'm sure some smart mathematician thought of a (log n) way.

Adrian

Am 29.09.2008 um 21:43 schrieb Andrew Coppin:

> The other day, I sat down to eat a 2 Kg block of chocolate - one of  
> those ones that's divided into lots of little squares. I proceeded  
> to recursively subdivide it into smaller and smaller blocks, and  
> then eat the individual squares in depth-first order. It was only  
> after getting through 16 of the things that I stopped to notice  
> that the whole bar just happens to have an exact power of two  
> squares on it.
>
> And it was some time after *that* when I thought to myself  
> "...woah, maybe do too much Haskell?" o_O
>
> Seriously, who recursively subdivides their food? I think I have  
> something wrong with me...
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe

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Re: Health effects

Benjamin L. Russell
On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 19:54:17 +0200, Adrian Neumann
<[hidden email]> wrote:

>I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n pieces.  
>You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts by cutting a grid.  
>But I'm sure some smart mathematician thought of a (log n) way.

Good thing that the chocolate slab was only 2 kg and of finite length.
Had it been of infinite length, we would need Dedekind cuts to
partition it.... ;)

-- Benjamin L. Russell

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Re: Health effects

Achim Schneider
Benjamin L.Russell <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Russell
>
Any relationship?

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Re: Health effects

Jon Fairbairn
In reply to this post by Adrian Neumann
Adrian Neumann <[hidden email]> writes:

> I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n
> pieces.  You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts
> by cutting a grid.  But I'm sure some smart mathematician
> thought of a (log n) way.

Are you allowed to move the pieces between cuts?

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Re: Health effects

Achim Schneider
Jon Fairbairn <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Adrian Neumann <[hidden email]> writes:
>
> > I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n
> > pieces.  You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts
> > by cutting a grid.  But I'm sure some smart mathematician
> > thought of a (log n) way.
>
> Are you allowed to move the pieces between cuts?
>
Later you're also going to demand to bend it in N dimensions, aren't
you?

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Re: Re: Health effects

Gianfranco Alongi
Are we assuming the bars to have an even distribution of mass along
the whole body?


On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 2:10 PM, Achim Schneider <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Jon Fairbairn <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Adrian Neumann <[hidden email]> writes:
>>
>> > I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n
>> > pieces.  You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts
>> > by cutting a grid.  But I'm sure some smart mathematician
>> > thought of a (log n) way.
>>
>> Are you allowed to move the pieces between cuts?
>>
> Later you're also going to demand to bend it in N dimensions, aren't
> you?
>
> --
> (c) this sig last receiving data processing entity. Inspect headers
> for copyright history. All rights reserved. Copying, hiring, renting,
> performance and/or quoting of this signature prohibited.
>
> _______________________________________________
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Re: Health effects

Dominic Steinitz
In reply to this post by Adrian Neumann
Adrian Neumann <aneumann <at> inf.fu-berlin.de> writes:

>
> I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n pieces.  
> You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts by cutting a grid.  
> But I'm sure some smart mathematician thought of a (log n) way.
>

You might try the ham sandwich theorem
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_sandwich_theorem as an hors d'oeuvre.

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Re: Re: Health effects

Gianfranco Alongi
Throw the "no free lunch"-theorem on top of that.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_free_lunch_theorem

On Wed, Oct 1, 2008 at 3:33 PM, Dominic Steinitz
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Adrian Neumann <aneumann <at> inf.fu-berlin.de> writes:
>
>>
>> I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n pieces.
>> You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts by cutting a grid.
>> But I'm sure some smart mathematician thought of a (log n) way.
>>
>
> You might try the ham sandwich theorem
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ham_sandwich_theorem as an hors d'oeuvre.
>
> _______________________________________________
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Re: Re: Health effects

Anton van Straaten
In reply to this post by Achim Schneider
Achim Schneider wrote:

> Jon Fairbairn <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> Adrian Neumann <[hidden email]> writes:
>>
>>> I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n
>>> pieces.  You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts
>>> by cutting a grid.  But I'm sure some smart mathematician
>>> thought of a (log n) way.
>> Are you allowed to move the pieces between cuts?
>>
> Later you're also going to demand to bend it in N dimensions, aren't
> you?

If extra dimensions are needed, perhaps the LHC could be pressed into
service.  Any Haskell programmers working there?

I'm sure we could settle many of these questions by injecting some
chocolate particles into the accelerator.  Who among us hasn't wondered
what chocolate looks like when traveling at relativistic speeds?  Best
case, we produce an infinitely dense micro-black hole made of chocolate,
which pretty much takes care of the whole recursive subdividing problem.

Plus, when popped into your mouth, it would evaporate via the tastiest
Hawking radiation imaginable.

Anton

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Re: Re: Health effects

Andrew Coppin
In reply to this post by Benjamin L. Russell
Benjamin L.Russell wrote:

> On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 19:54:17 +0200, Adrian Neumann
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>  
>> I often wonder how many cuts you need to divide a steak in n pieces.  
>> You can obviously get n pieces with (sqrt n) cuts by cutting a grid.  
>> But I'm sure some smart mathematician thought of a (log n) way.
>>    
>
> Good thing that the chocolate slab was only 2 kg and of finite length.
> Had it been of infinite length, we would need Dedekind cuts to
> partition it.... ;)
>  

You know, it's interesting... I posted this in another forum, and people
just said "dude, why would you try to eat a whole 2 Kg of chocolate?
That's really unhealthy." I post the same thing here and now people are
arguing about Dedekind cuts... da HELL?! o_O

An interesting dichotomy of perspectives, don't you think?

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