How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Hans Chen
Hi,

I'm a new xmonad user, and despite knowing next to no Haskell, I've made
xmonad work pretty much the way I want it. Fantastic!

Now there's only one major thing I miss. Let's get to the point before
boring you with rationales; I want DynamicLog to prefix my workspace names
with a number, e.g. "web", "chat", "work" becomes "1:web", "2:chat",
"3:work". I found a previous discussion[1] in the mailing list and a zsh
script[2], but I would like to do it directly in xmonad.hs, presumable
where I define my PP. (I use dzen2 to display the workspace names, if it
makes any difference).

My PP is pretty standard, you can find it here: http://paste.kde.org/564734/

So why do I want this? I use DynamicWorkspaces to create and delete
workspaces on the fly, but still prefer to use Mod(+shift)+<number> to
switch and move windows between workspaces. This is a bit hard, however,
without a number next to the workspace name. I know that you can bind a key
to selectWorkspace, but I find it faster to switch using the traditional
method when you don't have many workspaces.

I'm using xmonad 0.10 and xmonad-contrib 0.10, but I guess I wouldn't mind
trying out darcs if it's needed.

Help would be very much appreciated!

With best regards,
Hans

----
[1] http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/xmonad/2010-January/009683.html
[2] http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/xmonad/2010-February/009690.html
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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.
On 8 October 2012 19:17, Hans Chen <hanswchen at gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi,
>
> I'm a new xmonad user, and despite knowing next to no Haskell, I've made
> xmonad work pretty much the way I want it. Fantastic!
>
> Now there's only one major thing I miss. Let's get to the point before
> boring you with rationales; I want DynamicLog to prefix my workspace names
> with a number, e.g. "web", "chat", "work" becomes "1:web", "2:chat",
> "3:work". I found a previous discussion[1] in the mailing list and a zsh
> script[2], but I would like to do it directly in xmonad.hs, presumable where
> I define my PP. (I use dzen2 to display the workspace names, if it makes any
> difference).
>
> My PP is pretty standard, you can find it here: http://paste.kde.org/564734/
>
> So why do I want this? I use DynamicWorkspaces to create and delete
> workspaces on the fly, but still prefer to use Mod(+shift)+<number> to
> switch and move windows between workspaces. This is a bit hard, however,
> without a number next to the workspace name. I know that you can bind a key
> to selectWorkspace, but I find it faster to switch using the traditional
> method when you don't have many workspaces.
>
> I'm using xmonad 0.10 and xmonad-contrib 0.10, but I guess I wouldn't mind
> trying out darcs if it's needed.
>
> Help would be very much appreciated!
>
> With best regards,
> Hans
>
> ----
> [1] http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/xmonad/2010-January/009683.html
> [2] http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/xmonad/2010-February/009690.html

I'm not directly answering your question, but I'll try to help you
solve your problem.

First, I'd question myself why I would want to create workspaces on
the fiy :P, and then "keep them" enough time to make your issue
relevant. I always imagined dynamicworkspaces as a complement to
create "short-lived" workspaces. Also, if you are creating the same
(or similar) workspaces every time... maybe there isn't really a good
reason to create them on the fly.

In my case I keep 7 "fixed" WS:

1:terms, 2:web, 3:coding, 4:files, 5:media, 6:various, 7:im.

They are called that way, so it's easy to use the number to jump
between them and then I create/rename/remove "dynamic" ones in case
are needed.

Another module that helps (a lot) in jumping/moving between workspaces
are X.A.CycleRecentWS and X.A.CycleWS, I think you should take a look
:)

Regards!
--
Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
http://www.glatelier.org/
http://about.me/pablox/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:

> First, I'd question myself why I would want to create workspaces on
> the fiy :P,

Really !?

> and then "keep them" enough time to make your issue relevant. I always
> imagined dynamicworkspaces as a complement to create "short-lived"
> workspaces.

DynamicWorkspaces has made my use of computers bearable.

*Everything* I do, gets its own Dynamic workspace:

+ Letter to Aunt Mabel: open a new workspace;
+ fiddle with my XMonad config: new workspace;
+ Order a book/toaster/monitor: new workspace;
+ try to solve my dropped network connection problem: new workspace;
+ install some software: new workspace;
+ fix bug #7364: new workspace;
+ draw a new logo for the Worm Appreciation Society: new workspace;
+ the new course I am writing: its own workspace
+ topic I want to read up on and experiment with for the new course: new
  workspace. In reality, many workspaces, because I will want to
  investigate many different topics.

The fact that I can have all windows related to some activity grouped
together on a workspace, not interfering with those related to other
activities, combined with the ability to SWITCH TO THAT WORKSPACE IN
UNDER A SECOND, regardless of whether it was last visited seconds ago or
weeks ago, is one of the hugest boons to my productivity I have ever
experienced.

Having these workspaces have names I make up on the fly, makes it very
easy to remember what is what.

The real world has this habit of not letting me finish whatever I am
doing without interruption. I have to task switch between many things.
Some tasks last mere seconds, some take weeks or months. The ability to
have a workspace dedicated to each of these tasks and to switch between
the contexts they create at almost zero cost, and the concomitant
confidence this brings in being able to switch away from some context in
the knowledge that when I get around to resuming this task (be it 5
seconds from now or 3 weeks from now) everything will be waiting for me
exactly as I left it, is what make my modern use of computers bearable.

> In my case I keep 7 "fixed" WS:

Frankly, I don't see how you manage with only 7 workspaces.

> 1:terms, 2:web, 3:coding, 4:files, 5:media, 6:various, 7:im.

Coding? Just one workspace for coding? You can seriously fit *all* the
windows related to *all* the coding tasks you are currently working on,
on to a *sigle* workspace?  Remember that 'currenly' includes

+ the speculative refactoring of the frobnicator in the Fubar project,
  which you've been playing with in your spare moments over the last week
+ the showstopping segfault that your PHB/lover/most important client
  *needs* solving *this minute*.
+ the new feature you have been working on as your main coding task for
  the last 2 days
+ that damned bug #7364 which you've been chipping away at for the last
  month
+ your experiments with the new feature introduced by the latest release
  of some language/package you use
+ the code samples you are creating to help new people joining the Barfoo
  project, get going quickly

Each of these is likely to contain

+ Editor window
+ compilation/evaluation/running/tsting window(s)
+ documentation window
+ miscellaneous related web search window

All that, one one 'coding' workspace? Really?

(If you don't like coding, similar examples can be made in whatever
domain you like.)

Files? Various? Aah, takes me back to the Dark Ages before I got my
hands on DynamicWorkspaces.

Working with a window manager without Dynamic Workspaces, to me, looks
like working on a filesystem without mkdir and rmdir, where you
determine the directories you get when you configure your OS.

> They are called that way, so it's easy to use the number to jump
> between them

I have 3 keys for workspace navigation (and some related ones for screen
navigation)

+ Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
  substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take just
  two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files is 4: I
  just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in extremis, 'fi').
+ Select most recently used invisible workspace (very useful).
+ Cycle through (I almost never use this one)

On most of these I also have the following modifiers

+ SHIFT: send the focused window to the target workspace (keep focus on
  the source workspace)
+ CONTROL: carry the focused window to the target workspace (move focus
  to the target workspace)

You can pry my DynamicWorkspaces from my cold dead fingers.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Hans Chen
On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 6:04 AM, Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. <
pablo at glatelier.org> wrote:

> First, I'd question myself why I would want to create workspaces on
> the fiy :P, and then "keep them" enough time to make your issue
> relevant. I always imagined dynamicworkspaces as a complement to
> create "short-lived" workspaces. Also, if you are creating the same
> (or similar) workspaces every time... maybe there isn't really a good
> reason to create them on the fly.
>

Thanks for your suggestion. I tried it the "standard way" first, but found
that it didn't fit my workflow that well.


> In my case I keep 7 "fixed" WS:
>
> 1:terms, 2:web, 3:coding, 4:files, 5:media, 6:various, 7:im.
>
> They are called that way, so it's easy to use the number to jump
> between them and then I create/rename/remove "dynamic" ones in case
> are needed.
>

I had a similar setup, but with 10 workspaces with 3 "various" (unnamed)
ones. But I found that most of the time I only used about half of the
workspaces, since I use my computer for many different things. I still keep
a set of default workspaces, but DynamicWorkspaces is really nice for
creating space for the other tasks.


> Another module that helps (a lot) in jumping/moving between workspaces
> are X.A.CycleRecentWS and X.A.CycleWS, I think you should take a look
> :)


I use CycleWS to cycle between screens - it's a bit annoying for workspaces
since it may change the workspaces on the other screens. (If I cycle to a
workspace that's already shown on a physical screen, it will be swapped
with the current one.)

On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 9:18 AM, Jacek Generowicz
<jacek.generowicz at cern.ch>wrote:

>
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>  + Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
>   substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take just
>   two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files is 4: I
>   just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in extremis, 'fi').
>

Hm, maybe I should get used to that instead, it sounds really nice. Can you
please tell me more about how you have configured it to switch
automatically and/or post the relevant parts of your xmonad.hs? I use the
default keybindings, so I have to hit tab and return after entering the
substring in order to switch, which is a bit too slow for my liking.

Cheers,
Hans
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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

JG> Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
JG> substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take
JG> just two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files
JG> is 4: I just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in
JG> extremis, 'fi').

HC> Hm, maybe I should get used to that instead, it sounds really
HC> nice. Can you please tell me more about how you have configured it
HC> to switch automatically and/or post the relevant parts of your
HC> xmonad.hs? I use the default keybindings, so I have to hit tab and
HC> return after entering the substring in order to switch, which is a
HC> bit too slow for my liking.

OK, I'll have a go. I won't paste my whole config file, as that could
well overwhelm you with irrelevant nonsense (and I'm embarassed about
how much of a mess some of it is :-).

Let's see, I'll paste sections of my config file, with some commentary
in between

First of all, the ad-hoc spread of keybindings was driving me insane, so
I hacked up something which allows me to define keybindings in tabular
form. This gives me a convenient overview of my current keybindings and
really helps with selecting new keybindings or coming up with a sensible
set of bindings that works for me.  (For the sake of brevity I've elided
some of the action wrapper definitions from the /where/ section, leaving
mostly the ones related to window/workspace manipulation):

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
myKeyBindingsTable conf = mkKeymap conf $ concat $ table conf
                         
--        key                  M-              M-S-           M-C-           M-S-C-
table conf =
        [ k "<Return>"         __               __        openTerminal            __
        , k "a"            gotoScreen1      sendScreen1   takeScreen1      swapScreen1
        , k "b"            gotoWorkspace    sendWorkspace takeWorkspace    makeWorkspace
        , k "c"            conkeror         emacsclient         __                __
        , k "d"            launchWithDmenu      __              __                __
        , k "e"            wicdNetwork          __              __                __
        , k "f"            fullscreen       mirror        mirror                  __
        , k "g"            gotoMenu'        bringMenu'    windowMenu'      xmonadCommands
        , k "h"                __               __              __                __
        , k "i"                __               __              __                __
        , k "j"                __               __              __                __
        , k "k"            focusUrgent'         __              __         clearUrgents'
        , k "l"            expandMaster     shrinkMaster  incMaster        decMaster
        , k "m"            gotoMaster           __        shiftMaster'            __
        , k "n"            nextWindow       prevWindow    nextWindowSwap   prevWindowSwap
        , k "o"                __               __              __                __
        , k "p"            prevWindow       nextWindow    prevWindowSwap   nextWindowSwap -- reversed version of 'n'
        , k "q"            restartXMonad        __              __         quitXMonad
        , k "r"                __               __              __                __
        , k "s"            toggleStruts     cntrlCenter         __         swapScreens
        , k "t"            tileFloating         __              __                __
        , k "u"            gotoScreen0      sendScreen0   takeScreen0      swapScreen0
        , k "v"            volumeMuteToggle volumeDown    volumeUp                __
        , k "w"            nextWorkspace    prevWorkspace renameWorkspace' deleteWorkspace
        , k "x"                __               __              __                __
        , k "y"                __               __              __                __
        , k "z"                __               __              __                __
        , k "<Backspace>"  closeWindow          __              __         deleteWorkspace
        , k "<Space>"      nextLayout       prevLayout          __         resetLayout
        , k "-"            gotoRecentWS     sendRecentWS  takeRecentWS            __
        ]
 where
 k key m ms mc msc =
     [ bind "M-"      key m
     , bind "M-S-"    key ms
     , bind "M-C-"    key mc
     , bind "M-S-C-"  key msc
     ]

 bind modifiers key (U comment action) = (modifiers ++ key, action)
 bind modifiers key (B comment action) = (modifiers ++ key, action $ modifiers ++ key)

 __ = B "Available for use"
      (\key -> spawn $ "xmessage '" ++ key ++ " is not bound.'")

 openTerminal     = U "Open a terminal"           (spawn "rxvt-unicode +sb -fg wheat -bg grey10")
 closeWindow      = U "Close the focused window"  kill
 launchWithDmenu  = U "Dmenu"                     (spawn "exe=`dmenu_path | dmenu` && eval \"exec $exe\"")
 
 gotoMenu'        = U "Switch to window chosen by name via dmenu"         gotoMenu
 bringMenu'       = U "Bring a window chosen by name via dmenu"           bringMenu
 windowMenu'      = U "Pop up a 'flower' of actions to perform on window" windowMenu
 xmonadCommands   = U "Execute an XMonad command via dmenu"               (defaultCommands >>= runCommand)

 gotoScreen0      = U   "Go to screen 0" (onScreen 0 gotoX)
 sendScreen0      = U "Send to screen 0" (onScreen 0 sendX)
 takeScreen0      = U "Take to screen 0" (onScreen 0 takeX)
 gotoScreen1      = U   "Go to screen 1" (onScreen 1 gotoX)
 sendScreen1      = U "Send to screen 1" (onScreen 1 sendX)
 takeScreen1      = U "Take to screen 1" (onScreen 1 takeX)

 gotoRecentWS     = U "Switch to the most recently visited invisible workspace" (windows gotoRecent)
 sendRecentWS     = U   "Send to the most recently visited invisible workspace" (windows sendRecent)
 takeRecentWS     = U   "Take to the most recently visited invisible workspace" (windows takeRecent)

 gotoWorkspace    = U "Switch to named workspace with autoComplete" (selectWorkspace myXPConfig)
 makeWorkspace    = U "Switch to named workspace" (selectWorkspace myXPConfig { autoComplete = Nothing })
 sendWorkspace    = U   "Send to named workspace" (withWorkspace myXPConfig sendX)
 takeWorkspace    = U   "Take to named workspace" (withWorkspace myXPConfig takeX)

 nextWorkspace    = U "Go to next workspace"     (nextWS)
 prevWorkspace    = U "Go to previous workspace" (prevWS)

 renameWorkspace' = U "Rename workspace" (renameWorkspace myXPConfig)
 deleteWorkspace  = U "Remove workspace" (removeWorkspace)

 fullscreen       = U "Toggle fullscreening"     (sendMessage $ Toggle NBFULL)
 mirror           = U "Toggle layout mirrorring" (sendMessage $ Toggle MIRROR)

 expandMaster     = U "Increase the size of the master area" (sendMessage Expand)
 shrinkMaster     = U "Increase the size of the master area" (sendMessage Shrink)
 incMaster        = U "Increase the nummber of windows in the master area" (sendMessage (IncMasterN 1))
 decMaster        = U "Decrease the nummber of windows in the master area" (sendMessage (IncMasterN (-1)))
 gotoMaster       = U "Move focus to the master window" (windows focusMaster)
 shiftMaster'     = U "Make focused master, push others down."    (windows shiftMaster)

 -- TODO: + Make focus stay on the originally focused window
 --       + Think about the keybinding
 --       + Generalize to N screens
 swapScreens      = U "Swap currest screen with other"    (windows   swapTopScreens)
 swapScreen0      = U "Swap current screen with screen 0" (windows $ swapTopScreenWith 0)
 swapScreen1      = U "Swap current screen with screen 1" (windows $ swapTopScreenWith 1)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

mkKeymap comes from XMonad.Util.EZConfig

The Bs and Us all over the place are mine:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- Two varieties of Action: B(ound) is aware of the key that was used to
-- invoke it, U(nbound) is not aware of the key.
data Action = U String (          X ()) |
              B String (String -> X ())
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I planned to use the string in an automatically generated table of
keybindings that pops up at the behest of a keystroke, but I never got
around to doing that. (Ideas welcome.)

Homing in on the details of your question: from the bindings table you
can see that I use 'b' as my workspace selection key:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        , k "b"            gotoWorkspace    sendWorkspace takeWorkspace    makeWorkspace
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The corresponding action wrappers are defined as

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 gotoWorkspace    = U "Switch to named workspace with autoComplete" (selectWorkspace myXPConfig)
 makeWorkspace    = U "Switch to named workspace" (selectWorkspace myXPConfig { autoComplete = Nothing })
 sendWorkspace    = U   "Send to named workspace" (withWorkspace myXPConfig sendX)
 takeWorkspace    = U   "Take to named workspace" (withWorkspace myXPConfig takeX)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

U is a constructor of my Action type (shown above).

selectWorkspace and withWorkspace come from XMonad.Actions.DynamicWorkspaces

myXPConfig is rather simple:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
myXPConfig = defaultXPConfig {
 -- If only one completion remains, auto-select it after 1
 -- microsecond. Increasing the delay could help to stop accidentally
 -- sending keypresses to the newly focused window, but with my
 -- current usage, 1 microsecond is working just fine.
  autoComplete = Just 1
}
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

defaultXPConfig comes from XMonad.Prompt

I define sendX, takeX:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
gotoX = windows . view
sendX = windows . shift
takeX = sendX ->> gotoX

-- Helpers for performing multiple actions on the same entity
infixl 1 ->>
(a ->> b) c = do a c
                 b c
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

view and shift come from XMonad.StackSet

The whole lot is installed thus:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
myConfig = gnomeConfig
    { ...
    , keys = myKeyBindingsTable
    ...
    }
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

and gnomeConfig comes from XMonad.Config.Gnome (though I suspect that
there's nothing Gnome specific left in my config at all, by now).

I think I've shown all the necessary bits for the core of your question,
if not, don't hesitate to ask.

Hope it will be of some use.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.
On 9 October 2012 08:43, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:

>
> JG> Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
> JG> substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take
> JG> just two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files
> JG> is 4: I just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in
> JG> extremis, 'fi').
>
> HC> Hm, maybe I should get used to that instead, it sounds really
> HC> nice. Can you please tell me more about how you have configured it
> HC> to switch automatically and/or post the relevant parts of your
> HC> xmonad.hs? I use the default keybindings, so I have to hit tab and
> HC> return after entering the substring in order to switch, which is a
> HC> bit too slow for my liking.
>
> OK, I'll have a go. I won't paste my whole config file, as that could
> well overwhelm you with irrelevant nonsense (and I'm embarassed about
> how much of a mess some of it is :-).
>
> Let's see, I'll paste sections of my config file, with some commentary
> in between
>
> First of all, the ad-hoc spread of keybindings was driving me insane, so
> I hacked up something which allows me to define keybindings in tabular
> form. This gives me a convenient overview of my current keybindings and
> really helps with selecting new keybindings or coming up with a sensible
> set of bindings that works for me.  (For the sake of brevity I've elided
> some of the action wrapper definitions from the /where/ section, leaving
> mostly the ones related to window/workspace manipulation):

Please, can you upload your config file somewhere? It looks like a mess here =/.

PS.- I'm curious, which client are you using to have those "named" quotes?

Regards,
--
Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
http://www.glatelier.org/
http://about.me/pablox/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.
In reply to this post by Jacek Generowicz
On 9 October 2012 04:18, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:
>
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>
>> First, I'd question myself why I would want to create workspaces on
>> the fiy :P,
>
> Really !?

I started laughing here....

>> and then "keep them" enough time to make your issue relevant. I always
>> imagined dynamicworkspaces as a complement to create "short-lived"
>> workspaces.
>
> DynamicWorkspaces has made my use of computers bearable.
>
> *Everything* I do, gets its own Dynamic workspace:
>
> + Letter to Aunt Mabel: open a new workspace;
> + fiddle with my XMonad config: new workspace;
> + Order a book/toaster/monitor: new workspace;
> + try to solve my dropped network connection problem: new workspace;
> + install some software: new workspace;
> + fix bug #7364: new workspace;
> + draw a new logo for the Worm Appreciation Society: new workspace;
> + the new course I am writing: its own workspace
> + topic I want to read up on and experiment with for the new course: new
>   workspace. In reality, many workspaces, because I will want to
>   investigate many different topics.

That's sounds great. I don't understand how (or where) in the screen
you can list all those workspaces without going crazy or memorizing
everything. I tried to use DWS and every new workspace is added before
the first one (which seems a bit odd to me) and after a while dzen was
totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of everything.

> The fact that I can have all windows related to some activity grouped
> together on a workspace, not interfering with those related to other
> activities, combined with the ability to SWITCH TO THAT WORKSPACE IN
> UNDER A SECOND, regardless of whether it was last visited seconds ago or
> weeks ago, is one of the hugest boons to my productivity I have ever
> experienced.
>
> Having these workspaces have names I make up on the fly, makes it very
> easy to remember what is what.
>
> The real world has this habit of not letting me finish whatever I am
> doing without interruption. I have to task switch between many things.
> Some tasks last mere seconds, some take weeks or months. The ability to
> have a workspace dedicated to each of these tasks and to switch between
> the contexts they create at almost zero cost, and the concomitant
> confidence this brings in being able to switch away from some context in
> the knowledge that when I get around to resuming this task (be it 5
> seconds from now or 3 weeks from now) everything will be waiting for me
> exactly as I left it, is what make my modern use of computers bearable.

I agree... you never turn off your computer do you?

>> In my case I keep 7 "fixed" WS:
>
> Frankly, I don't see how you manage with only 7 workspaces.
>
>> 1:terms, 2:web, 3:coding, 4:files, 5:media, 6:various, 7:im.
>
> Coding? Just one workspace for coding? You can seriously fit *all* the
> windows related to *all* the coding tasks you are currently working on,
> on to a *sigle* workspace?  Remember that 'currenly' includes
>
> + the speculative refactoring of the frobnicator in the Fubar project,
>   which you've been playing with in your spare moments over the last week
> + the showstopping segfault that your PHB/lover/most important client
>   *needs* solving *this minute*.
> + the new feature you have been working on as your main coding task for
>   the last 2 days
> + that damned bug #7364 which you've been chipping away at for the last
>   month
> + your experiments with the new feature introduced by the latest release
>   of some language/package you use
> + the code samples you are creating to help new people joining the Barfoo
>   project, get going quickly

Actually I use tmux + vim and I'm really happy with it. Normally I
code for myself or little projects so I've never found with some of
the use cases you said before. Anyway, I get the point :).

> Each of these is likely to contain
>
> + Editor window
> + compilation/evaluation/running/tsting window(s)
> + documentation window
> + miscellaneous related web search window

Tmux + tmuxinator <3.

> All that, one one 'coding' workspace? Really?
>
> (If you don't like coding, similar examples can be made in whatever
> domain you like.)
>
> Files? Various? Aah, takes me back to the Dark Ages before I got my
> hands on DynamicWorkspaces.

Here I was like ROFLMAO.

> Working with a window manager without Dynamic Workspaces, to me, looks
> like working on a filesystem without mkdir and rmdir, where you
> determine the directories you get when you configure your OS.
>
>> They are called that way, so it's easy to use the number to jump
>> between them
>
> I have 3 keys for workspace navigation (and some related ones for screen
> navigation)
>
> + Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
>   substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take just
>   two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files is 4: I
>   just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in extremis, 'fi').
> + Select most recently used invisible workspace (very useful).
> + Cycle through (I almost never use this one)
>
> On most of these I also have the following modifiers
>
> + SHIFT: send the focused window to the target workspace (keep focus on
>   the source workspace)
> + CONTROL: carry the focused window to the target workspace (move focus
>   to the target workspace)

Well, I couldn't imagined how to do that, so I've never tried too. It
would be awesome if you can post your complete config file in
paste-like service like gist or pastebin. It could help me to evolve
from those medieval times.

> You can pry my DynamicWorkspaces from my cold dead fingers.

... I was still laughing here. Thanks for your time, it was an AWESOME
email, you should post it somewhere else.

I honestly have been working for a couple of months and I'm very
comfortable with the setup that I got right now :)

Regards,
--
Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
http://www.glatelier.org/
http://about.me/pablox/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Carlos López Camey
2012/10/10 Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. <pablo at glatelier.org>:

> On 9 October 2012 04:18, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:
>>
>> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>>
>>> First, I'd question myself why I would want to create workspaces on
>>> the fiy :P,
>>
>> Really !?
>
> I started laughing here....

FWIW, I would like a setup where I can use Actions.CycleWS functions
without going through empty workspaces. This could be
simulated with workspaces on the fly.

>>> and then "keep them" enough time to make your issue relevant. I always
>>> imagined dynamicworkspaces as a complement to create "short-lived"
>>> workspaces.
>>
>> DynamicWorkspaces has made my use of computers bearable.
>>
>> *Everything* I do, gets its own Dynamic workspace:
>>
>> + Letter to Aunt Mabel: open a new workspace;
>> + fiddle with my XMonad config: new workspace;
>> + Order a book/toaster/monitor: new workspace;
>> + try to solve my dropped network connection problem: new workspace;
>> + install some software: new workspace;
>> + fix bug #7364: new workspace;
>> + draw a new logo for the Worm Appreciation Society: new workspace;
>> + the new course I am writing: its own workspace
>> + topic I want to read up on and experiment with for the new course: new
>>   workspace. In reality, many workspaces, because I will want to
>>   investigate many different topics.
>
> That's sounds great. I don't understand how (or where) in the screen
> you can list all those workspaces without going crazy or memorizing
> everything. I tried to use DWS and every new workspace is added before
> the first one (which seems a bit odd to me) and after a while dzen was
> totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of everything.
>
>> The fact that I can have all windows related to some activity grouped
>> together on a workspace, not interfering with those related to other
>> activities, combined with the ability to SWITCH TO THAT WORKSPACE IN
>> UNDER A SECOND, regardless of whether it was last visited seconds ago or
>> weeks ago, is one of the hugest boons to my productivity I have ever
>> experienced.
>>
>> Having these workspaces have names I make up on the fly, makes it very
>> easy to remember what is what.
>>
>> The real world has this habit of not letting me finish whatever I am
>> doing without interruption. I have to task switch between many things.
>> Some tasks last mere seconds, some take weeks or months. The ability to
>> have a workspace dedicated to each of these tasks and to switch between
>> the contexts they create at almost zero cost, and the concomitant
>> confidence this brings in being able to switch away from some context in
>> the knowledge that when I get around to resuming this task (be it 5
>> seconds from now or 3 weeks from now) everything will be waiting for me
>> exactly as I left it, is what make my modern use of computers bearable.
>
> I agree... you never turn off your computer do you?
>
>>> In my case I keep 7 "fixed" WS:
>>
>> Frankly, I don't see how you manage with only 7 workspaces.
>>
>>> 1:terms, 2:web, 3:coding, 4:files, 5:media, 6:various, 7:im.
>>
>> Coding? Just one workspace for coding? You can seriously fit *all* the
>> windows related to *all* the coding tasks you are currently working on,
>> on to a *sigle* workspace?  Remember that 'currenly' includes
>>
>> + the speculative refactoring of the frobnicator in the Fubar project,
>>   which you've been playing with in your spare moments over the last week
>> + the showstopping segfault that your PHB/lover/most important client
>>   *needs* solving *this minute*.
>> + the new feature you have been working on as your main coding task for
>>   the last 2 days
>> + that damned bug #7364 which you've been chipping away at for the last
>>   month
>> + your experiments with the new feature introduced by the latest release
>>   of some language/package you use
>> + the code samples you are creating to help new people joining the Barfoo
>>   project, get going quickly
>
> Actually I use tmux + vim and I'm really happy with it. Normally I
> code for myself or little projects so I've never found with some of
> the use cases you said before. Anyway, I get the point :).
>
>> Each of these is likely to contain
>>
>> + Editor window
>> + compilation/evaluation/running/tsting window(s)
>> + documentation window
>> + miscellaneous related web search window
>
> Tmux + tmuxinator <3.
>
>> All that, one one 'coding' workspace? Really?
>>
>> (If you don't like coding, similar examples can be made in whatever
>> domain you like.)
>>
>> Files? Various? Aah, takes me back to the Dark Ages before I got my
>> hands on DynamicWorkspaces.
>
> Here I was like ROFLMAO.
>
>> Working with a window manager without Dynamic Workspaces, to me, looks
>> like working on a filesystem without mkdir and rmdir, where you
>> determine the directories you get when you configure your OS.
>>
>>> They are called that way, so it's easy to use the number to jump
>>> between them
>>
>> I have 3 keys for workspace navigation (and some related ones for screen
>> navigation)
>>
>> + Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
>>   substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take just
>>   two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files is 4: I
>>   just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in extremis, 'fi').
>> + Select most recently used invisible workspace (very useful).
>> + Cycle through (I almost never use this one)
>>
>> On most of these I also have the following modifiers
>>
>> + SHIFT: send the focused window to the target workspace (keep focus on
>>   the source workspace)
>> + CONTROL: carry the focused window to the target workspace (move focus
>>   to the target workspace)
>
> Well, I couldn't imagined how to do that, so I've never tried too. It
> would be awesome if you can post your complete config file in
> paste-like service like gist or pastebin. It could help me to evolve
> from those medieval times.
>
>> You can pry my DynamicWorkspaces from my cold dead fingers.
>
> ... I was still laughing here. Thanks for your time, it was an AWESOME
> email, you should post it somewhere else.
>
> I honestly have been working for a couple of months and I'm very
> comfortable with the setup that I got right now :)
>
> Regards,
> --
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
> http://www.glatelier.org/
> http://about.me/pablox/
> http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
> Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/
>
> _______________________________________________
> xmonad mailing list
> xmonad at haskell.org
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/xmonad


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Hans Chen
On Tue, Oct 9, 2012 at 1:43 PM, Jacek Generowicz
<jacek.generowicz at cern.ch>wrote:

>
> OK, I'll have a go. I won't paste my whole config file, as that could
> well overwhelm you with irrelevant nonsense (and I'm embarassed about
> how much of a mess some of it is :-).


Wow, thanks for the comprehensive explanation! I actually figured it out
myself, but your config looks very interesting and I'll certainly see what
more I can learn from it.

Here's what I did:
1. Define two custom prompts:

myXPConfigSelect = defaultXPConfig
    { autoComplete        = Just 0
    , showCompletionOnTab = True
    }

myXPConfigNew = defaultXPConfig
    { autoComplete        = Nothing
    , showCompletionOnTab = True
    }
(I have some more settings but they aren't relevant here.)

2. Bind keys for switching and creating workspaces, in the latter case it
doesn't autocomplete:

-- Switch workspace
, ((modm              , xK_h), selectWorkspace  myXPConfigSelect)
-- Move window to workspace
, ((modm .|. shiftMask, xK_h), withWorkspace myXPConfigSelect (windows .
W.shift))
-- Create new workspace
, ((modm              , xK_n), selectWorkspace myXPConfigNew)
-- Move window to newly created workspace
, ((modm .|. shiftMask, xK_n), withWorkspace myXPConfigNew (windows .
W.shift)

Works like a charm. I'm still experimenting with which keys to use, but
otherwise I'm pretty satisfied with this.

On Wed, Oct 10, 2012 at 12:04 AM, Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. <
pablo at glatelier.org> wrote:

>
> That's sounds great. I don't understand how (or where) in the screen
> you can list all those workspaces without going crazy or memorizing
> everything. I tried to use DWS and every new workspace is added before
> the first one (which seems a bit odd to me) and after a while dzen was
> totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of everything.
>

I was also annoyed by how newly created workspaces would mess up the order
with my configured ones. I found this patch that fixes it for me:
http://www.haskell.org/pipermail/xmonad/2012-July/012810.html

Ideally I would like to order all workspaces by when they were created.

On Wed, Oct 10, 2012 at 12:26 AM, Carlos L?pez Camey <c.lopez at kmels.net>wrote:

>
> FWIW, I would like a setup where I can use Actions.CycleWS functions
> without going through empty workspaces. This could be
> simulated with workspaces on the fly.
>

And I would like Actions.CycleWS to ignore workspaces that are visible on
other screen (to avoid switching those workspaces). Now I'm going off
topic, but does anyone know if it's possible with the toggleOrDoSkip
function?

About the original question about prefixing workspace names with numbers,
I'm happy with the prompt + autocomplete, so I don't really need an answer
(unless it's easy to achieve).

Cheers,
Hans
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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz
In reply to this post by Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:

> On 9 October 2012 04:18, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:

>> *Everything* I do, gets its own Dynamic workspace:
>>
>> + Letter to Aunt Mabel: open a new workspace;
>> + fiddle with my XMonad config: new workspace;
>> + Order a book/toaster/monitor: new workspace;
>> + try to solve my dropped network connection problem: new workspace;
>> + install some software: new workspace;
>> + fix bug #7364: new workspace;
>> + draw a new logo for the Worm Appreciation Society: new workspace;
>> + the new course I am writing: its own workspace
>> + topic I want to read up on and experiment with for the new course: new
>>   workspace. In reality, many workspaces, because I will want to
>>   investigate many different topics.
>
> That's sounds great. I don't understand how (or where) in the screen
> you can list all those workspaces without going crazy or memorizing
> everything.

My top notification bar contains workspace names (19 of them, just now)
and the layout name. Nothing else. (Hmm, I could probably do without tha
layout name.)

This bar lists, from left to right

+ The currently active workspace, in white
+ The workspace visible on the other monitor, in grey
+ The rest, in most-to-least recently visited order, red for empty ones,
  green otherwise

> I tried to use DWS and every new workspace is added before
> the first one (which seems a bit odd to me)

Hint:

myDzenPP = defaultPP
  {
  ....
  , ppSort = getSortByMyRule
  }

Go to town!

> and after a while dzen was totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of
> everything.

Well, yes, as the number of workspaces grows, it does become more
difficult to keep track of things. But it's much *more* difficult to
keep track of all those things if you have to stuff them all on a mere 7
workspaces with names like 'files' and 'various'.

> you never turn off your computer do you?

Hardware upgrades are always dark days.

(OK, ok, I also have to reboot because of software updates every now and
then.)

But seriously, rebooting my computer feels like taking all my belongings
out of my house and then putting them back into place. I can't fathom
why anyone would want to do that voluntarily.

> Actually I use tmux + vim

... to do the job of XMonad, it would seem.

>> I have 3 keys for workspace navigation (and some related ones for screen
>> navigation)
>>
>> + Select workspace by name Automatically switches when unique starting
>>   substring is entered: this means that most workspace switches take just
>>   two keystrokes. And I don't have to remember that, say, files is 4: I
>>   just have to remember that files starts with 'f' (or, in extremis, 'fi').
>> + Select most recently used invisible workspace (very useful).
>> + Cycle through (I almost never use this one)
>>
>> On most of these I also have the following modifiers
>>
>> + SHIFT: send the focused window to the target workspace (keep focus on
>>   the source workspace)
>> + CONTROL: carry the focused window to the target workspace (move focus
>>   to the target workspace)
>
> Well, I couldn't imagined how to do that, so I've never tried too. It
> would be awesome if you can post your complete config file in
> paste-like service like gist or pastebin. It could help me to evolve
> from those medieval times.

I'd rather not paste my *whole* config (at least not before a clean up,
and I don't have time for that at the moment). Have a look at what I
posted for Hans, and ask if you want any clarification or further info.

>> You can pry my DynamicWorkspaces from my cold dead fingers.
>
> ... I was still laughing here. Thanks for your time, it was an AWESOME
> email, you should post it somewhere else.

Thanks for your kind words. They brightened up my morning.

> I honestly have been working for a couple of months and I'm very
> comfortable with the setup that I got right now :)

Well, that's what matters. We all have different styles and habits. I'm
sure that what works for me will be completely wrong for many others.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz
In reply to this post by Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:

> Please, can you upload your config file somewhere? It looks like a mess here =/.

OK, ok, here it is:

    http://pastebin.com/A53AfM1D   (30 day expiry)

(It wasn't as much of a mess as I feared. Haven't ventured in there for
a while)

> PS.- I'm curious, which client are you using to have those "named" quotes?

Short answer:

   any decent editor that understands rectangles.

Long answer:

   You probably won't like this, as you admitted to belonging to the
   Dark Side upthread. There is something called Supercite which plugs
   into any Emacs mail client and does these sorts of quotes. When I
   tried it, it seemed more trouble that it was worth. On the occasions
   that this quoting style seems useful, I just use Emacs' rectangle
   operations.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz
In reply to this post by Hans Chen

Hans Chen writes:

> Wow, thanks for the comprehensive explanation!

'Twas a pleasure.

> 2. Bind keys for switching and creating workspaces, in the latter case it
> doesn't autocomplete:

Yes, My config needs improving in this respect.

On the one hand I like just being able to create a new workspace with
the same key as switching. On the other, if I want to create a workspace
with a name which starts with the same letter as an existing one, I get
a switch. So I have to resort to tricks like prepending the new name
with an underscore, and then deleting it before hitting return.

So, in the back of my mind I've been meaning to create a dedicated 'new
workspace' key. Maybe this will motivate me to get on and do it.

> Works like a charm. I'm still experimenting with which keys to use, but
> otherwise I'm pretty satisfied with this.

Aaah, I love the sound of productivity increasing.

> Ideally I would like to order all workspaces by when they were created.

Hmm. Interesting choice.

> And I would like Actions.CycleWS to ignore workspaces that are visible on
> other screen (to avoid switching those workspaces).

Hmm. Another interesting choice.

> Now I'm going off topic, but does anyone know if it's possible with
> the toggleOrDoSkip function?

Not off the top of my head, sorry.

> About the original question about prefixing workspace names with numbers,
> I'm happy with the prompt + autocomplete, so I don't really need an answer
> (unless it's easy to achieve).

I'd have to dig around to remind myself about the relevant plumbing, so
if you're happy with what you've got, I'll pass on this one.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

Jacek Generowicz writes:

> Hans Chen writes:

>> 2. Bind keys for switching and creating workspaces, in the latter case it
>> doesn't autocomplete:
>
> Yes, My config needs improving in this respect.
>
> On the one hand I like just being able to create a new workspace with
> the same key as switching. On the other, if I want to create a workspace
> with a name which starts with the same letter as an existing one, I get
> a switch. So I have to resort to tricks like prepending the new name
> with an underscore, and then deleting it before hitting return.
>
> So, in the back of my mind I've been meaning to create a dedicated 'new
> workspace' key. Maybe this will motivate me to get on and do it.

Duh!

So it turns out that I had already done this. I just needed to switch
off autocompletion for my renameWorkspace.

Thanks for giving me this much-needed push!


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.
In reply to this post by Jacek Generowicz
On 10 October 2012 02:50, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:

>
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>
>> On 9 October 2012 04:18, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:
>
>>> *Everything* I do, gets its own Dynamic workspace:
>>>
>>> + Letter to Aunt Mabel: open a new workspace;
>>> + fiddle with my XMonad config: new workspace;
>>> + Order a book/toaster/monitor: new workspace;
>>> + try to solve my dropped network connection problem: new workspace;
>>> + install some software: new workspace;
>>> + fix bug #7364: new workspace;
>>> + draw a new logo for the Worm Appreciation Society: new workspace;
>>> + the new course I am writing: its own workspace
>>> + topic I want to read up on and experiment with for the new course: new
>>>   workspace. In reality, many workspaces, because I will want to
>>>   investigate many different topics.
>>
>> That's sounds great. I don't understand how (or where) in the screen
>> you can list all those workspaces without going crazy or memorizing
>> everything.
>
> My top notification bar contains workspace names (19 of them, just now)
> and the layout name. Nothing else. (Hmm, I could probably do without tha
> layout name.)
>
> This bar lists, from left to right
>
> + The currently active workspace, in white
> + The workspace visible on the other monitor, in grey
> + The rest, in most-to-least recently visited order, red for empty ones,
>   green otherwise

I haven't thought about the last point... sounds really interesting!

>> I tried to use DWS and every new workspace is added before
>> the first one (which seems a bit odd to me)
>
> Hint:
>
> myDzenPP = defaultPP
>   {
>   ....
>   , ppSort = getSortByMyRule
>   }
>
> Go to town!

Thanks for the tip :).

>> and after a while dzen was totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of
>> everything.
>
> Well, yes, as the number of workspaces grows, it does become more
> difficult to keep track of things. But it's much *more* difficult to
> keep track of all those things if you have to stuff them all on a mere 7
> workspaces with names like 'files' and 'various'.

Of course it's hard if you aren't in my mind O_o. I know perfectly
what's in each workspace.

>> you never turn off your computer do you?
>
> Hardware upgrades are always dark days.
>
> (OK, ok, I also have to reboot because of software updates every now and
> then.)
>
> But seriously, rebooting my computer feels like taking all my belongings
> out of my house and then putting them back into place. I can't fathom
> why anyone would want to do that voluntarily.

I don't have a workstation, only my laptop and a 24'' monitor. So I
have to turn off my computer every day.

>> Actually I use tmux + vim
>
> ... to do the job of XMonad, it would seem.

It's a good complement, It's very easy to have tmuxinator
configuration to open the pane configuration I want. Sadly, that's
impossible to do with xmonad.

>>> You can pry my DynamicWorkspaces from my cold dead fingers.
>>
>> ... I was still laughing here. Thanks for your time, it was an AWESOME
>> email, you should post it somewhere else.
>
> Thanks for your kind words. They brightened up my morning.

Was that ironic?

>> I honestly have been working for a couple of months and I'm very
>> comfortable with the setup that I got right now :)
>
> Well, that's what matters. We all have different styles and habits. I'm
> sure that what works for me will be completely wrong for many others.

Yep, though some things you have written are good ideas that I'm
probably going to implement in the near future.

On 10 October 2012 03:57, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:

>
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>
>> Please, can you upload your config file somewhere? It looks like a mess here =/.
>
> OK, ok, here it is:
>
>     http://pastebin.com/A53AfM1D   (30 day expiry)
>
> (It wasn't as much of a mess as I feared. Haven't ventured in there for
> a while)

Thank a lot, I'm sure it'll help me a lot! :D

>> PS.- I'm curious, which client are you using to have those "named" quotes?
>
> Short answer:
>
>    any decent editor that understands rectangles.
>
> Long answer:
>
>    You probably won't like this, as you admitted to belonging to the
>    Dark Side upthread.

LoL.

>    There is something called Supercite which plugs
>    into any Emacs mail client and does these sorts of quotes. When I
>    tried it, it seemed more trouble that it was worth. On the occasions
>    that this quoting style seems useful, I just use Emacs' rectangle
>    operations.

Oh, thanks, though I'm still used to gmail web interface =(.

Regards,
--
Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
http://www.glatelier.org/
http://about.me/pablox/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:

>>> and after a while dzen was totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of
>>> everything.
>>
>> Well, yes, as the number of workspaces grows, it does become more
>> difficult to keep track of things. But it's much *more* difficult to
>> keep track of all those things if you have to stuff them all on a mere 7
>> workspaces with names like 'files' and 'various'.
>
> Of course it's hard if you aren't in my mind O_o. I know perfectly
> what's in each workspace.

I totally admit that XMonad is just a crutch I need because of the
limitations of my brain. My poor little brain just can't keep track of
all of this (certainly not efficiently), if yours can, then I send a
little nod of admiration in your general direction.

But I find it hard to believe that anyone who can keep track of N (for
large values of N) windows on a single workspace, would find it *more*
difficult to keep track of the same windows, when spread out over
several named workspaced containing related windows. But then experience
tells me that people's brains can be wired up completely differently.

>> But seriously, rebooting my computer feels like taking all my belongings
>> out of my house and then putting them back into place. I can't fathom
>> why anyone would want to do that voluntarily.
>
> I don't have a workstation, only my laptop and a 24'' monitor. So I
> have to turn off my computer every day.

Huh?

I don't have a workstation, only my laptop and a 26'' monitor. I have a
laptop as my main workstation precisely to enable me NOT TO SWITCH IT
OFF AT ALL, even when I have to move physically to another country. Yes,
I might suspend or hibernate it, but switch it off? Why on earth would
you want/need to do that?

> It's a good complement, It's very easy to have tmuxinator

OK, what's tuxminator? Cursory Googling doesn't come up with anything
sensible, two days in a row now, only wallpaper.

> configuration to open the pane configuration I want. Sadly, that's
> impossible to do with xmonad.

Granted, I haven't found anything like that in XMonad, but then I
haven't really looked, because I don't really need it, becasue I never
switch my computer off.

>> Thanks for your kind words. They brightened up my morning.
>
> Was that ironic?

No, why?

I interpreted your remarks as laughing with me rather than laughing at
me. I enjoyed sharing the laugh, and thanked you for sharing it.

> Yep, though some things you have written are good ideas that I'm
> probably going to implement in the near future.

Cool, it tickles me pink to have some positive influence on people.

> Oh, thanks, though I'm still used to gmail web interface =(.

That's something else that I find unfathomable. Email is essentially
text. To deal with it efficiently, I want to use the most efficient tool
I have for dealing with text. That would be the text editor I use daily,
and whose actions have been imprinting themselves into the core of my
nervous system over the course of many years. Regardless of what your
choice of editor is, I can't fathom why you would want to relinquish all
that in favour of a slow, cumbersome, inefficient, pointy-clickety
interface.

OK, maybe managing your mail, as opposed to writing it, is something
that only Emacs users would understand/want/appreciate. But *writing*
your mail? Surely *everyone* would want to write their mail in their
standard text editor, rather than some ad-hoc one. (So that, for
example, if you want to prepend the author's initials to each of his
quoted lines, there's nothing to wonder about: it just happens
naturally.)

Personally, I just can't stomach any mail interface that is not Embedded
in Emacs. But then Emacs is pretty much my OS.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Brandon Allbery
On Thu, Oct 11, 2012 at 3:53 AM, Jacek Generowicz
<jacek.generowicz at cern.ch>wrote:

> > It's a good complement, It's very easy to have tmuxinator
>
> OK, what's tuxminator? Cursory Googling doesn't come up with anything
> sensible, two days in a row now, only wallpaper.
>

Google can only correct so many kinds of typoes.
https://github.com/aziz/tmuxinator --- note, not "tuxminator".  ("tmux" is
a turbocharged replacement for "screen".)

As for controlling xmonad, you can do some of it with wmctrl/nawm and
EwmhDesktops, and now that I'm in a position to start stabilizing my life
again I can try to look into turning ServerMode from a somewhat
unfortunately designed proof of concept into a usable feature.

--
brandon s allbery kf8nh                               sine nomine associates
allbery.b at gmail.com                                  ballbery at sinenomine.net
unix/linux, openafs, kerberos, infrastructure          http://sinenomine.net
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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

POdAC> tmuxinator

JG> OK, what's tuxminator? Cursory Googling doesn't come up with anything
JG> sensible, two days in a row now, only wallpaper.

BA> Google can only correct so many kinds of typoes.

The human brain is a fascinating thing! I went through that, character
by character, both yesterday and today, and completely failed to spot my
adulteration of the original. I guess the dapper penguin was so firmly
lodged in my mind, that it couldn't entertain the possibility of the
first three characters being wrong.

Thanks.


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C.
In reply to this post by Jacek Generowicz
On 11 October 2012 04:53, Jacek Generowicz <jacek.generowicz at cern.ch> wrote:

>
> Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:
>
>>>> and after a while dzen was totally filled, so I couldn't keep track of
>>>> everything.
>>>
>>> Well, yes, as the number of workspaces grows, it does become more
>>> difficult to keep track of things. But it's much *more* difficult to
>>> keep track of all those things if you have to stuff them all on a mere 7
>>> workspaces with names like 'files' and 'various'.
>>
>> Of course it's hard if you aren't in my mind O_o. I know perfectly
>> what's in each workspace.
>
> I totally admit that XMonad is just a crutch I need because of the
> limitations of my brain. My poor little brain just can't keep track of
> all of this (certainly not efficiently), if yours can, then I send a
> little nod of admiration in your general direction.
>
> But I find it hard to believe that anyone who can keep track of N (for
> large values of N) windows on a single workspace, would find it *more*
> difficult to keep track of the same windows, when spread out over
> several named workspaced containing related windows. But then experience
> tells me that people's brains can be wired up completely differently.

The thing is that actually I don't have many windows opened =P. Remember that
I do power off  my computer.

>>> But seriously, rebooting my computer feels like taking all my belongings
>>> out of my house and then putting them back into place. I can't fathom
>>> why anyone would want to do that voluntarily.
>>
>> I don't have a workstation, only my laptop and a 24'' monitor. So I
>> have to turn off my computer every day.
>
> Huh?
>
> I don't have a workstation, only my laptop and a 26'' monitor. I have a
> laptop as my main workstation precisely to enable me NOT TO SWITCH IT
> OFF AT ALL, even when I have to move physically to another country. Yes,
> I might suspend or hibernate it, but switch it off? Why on earth would
> you want/need to do that?

Hibernate has never worked ok with my laptops and I move my laptop almost
everyday. Even though, I proposed myself (once again) to try to get it working!
(I have faith on TuxOnIce).

>> configuration to open the pane configuration I want. Sadly, that's
>> impossible to do with xmonad.
>
> Granted, I haven't found anything like that in XMonad, but then I
> haven't really looked, because I don't really need it, becasue I never
> switch my computer off.

Afaik it's impossible =(.

>>> Thanks for your kind words. They brightened up my morning.
>>
>> Was that ironic?
>
> No, why?
>
> I interpreted your remarks as laughing with me rather than laughing at
> me. I enjoyed sharing the laugh, and thanked you for sharing it.

<3.

>> Yep, though some things you have written are good ideas that I'm
>> probably going to implement in the near future.
>
> Cool, it tickles me pink to have some positive influence on people.

You xmonad configuration is really "sui generis", I've seen a lot of them, but
no one to that level of details. It's well commented and has the best hotkey
configuration I've ever seen. I totally fell in love with it and I'm prolly
going to make a big mix between mine and yours.

>> Oh, thanks, though I'm still used to gmail web interface =(.
>
> That's something else that I find unfathomable. Email is essentially
> text. To deal with it efficiently, I want to use the most efficient tool
> I have for dealing with text. That would be the text editor I use daily,
> and whose actions have been imprinting themselves into the core of my
> nervous system over the course of many years. Regardless of what your
> choice of editor is, I can't fathom why you would want to relinquish all
> that in favour of a slow, cumbersome, inefficient, pointy-clickety
> interface.

I use the hotkeys which helps a bit, but after started using xmonad and then
pentadactyl reaching the mouse it's a pain that I try to avoid at all costs.

> OK, maybe managing your mail, as opposed to writing it, is something
> that only Emacs users would understand/want/appreciate. But *writing*
> your mail? Surely *everyone* would want to write their mail in their
> standard text editor, rather than some ad-hoc one. (So that, for
> example, if you want to prepend the author's initials to each of his
> quoted lines, there's nothing to wonder about: it just happens
> naturally.)

Yeah, I somehow do that. In fact this email is being written in a gvim window.
I use pentadactyl so after a couple of keystrokes (<C-i>) on a textarea throws
me here.

The only issue with that is that I still can't make xmonad understand that all
these windows should be floating and not tiled =/. I wrote in this list a while
ago but every attempt to make a "generic" declaration with a managehook failed.

> Personally, I just can't stomach any mail interface that is not Embedded
> in Emacs. But then Emacs is pretty much my OS.

I don't know if I can "embed" a mail interface in vim (I haven't searched), but
I guess that mutt is the closest thing to that.

Anyway, once again I felt motivated to get rid of the gmail web interface :)

Regards,
--
Pablo Olmos de Aguilera Corradini - @PaBLoX
http://www.glatelier.org/
http://about.me/pablox/
http://www.linkedin.com/in/pablooda/
Linux User: #456971 - http://counter.li.org/


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Jacek Generowicz

Pablo Olmos de Aguilera C. writes:

> Hibernate has never worked ok with my laptops and I move my laptop almost
> everyday.

Understood. This is one of the two or three main reasons why I tolerated
OS X for 8 years: that shit just works (TM).

Incidentally, the immiscibility of XMonad and Aqua was one of, if not
*the* major reason for me moving back.

My hibernation was broken for a while until around a week ago.  Painful
times. (I've been back in Linux long enough now, that it's probably time
to ditch Ubuntu.) The trouble with trying to solve problems of this kind
is that it forces you to reboot your computer. Many times. And, by now,
you know how I feel about that.

Hint: TuxOnIce

> Even though, I proposed myself (once again) to try to get it working!
> (I have faith on TuxOnIce).

... Ah, you already know about it. Well, it worked like a charm for me.

> You xmonad configuration is really "sui generis",

Heh, yes, I'm a /sui generis/ kinda guy :-)

> It's well commented

I tried. But I fell way short of the standards I was hoping to achieve,
before I could no longer justify spending any more time on XMonad. The
thing is, I know that a future me will, one day, invest another solid
chunk of time in trying to get XMonad to do his bidding ... and that
guy's a maniac, and he knows where I live.

> and has the best hotkey configuration I've ever seen.

Yes, I do like that scheme. Though I'm sure it could be made better,
it's already a huge improvement on the standard, scatter arcane
keybinding incantations in a random order approach.

One day, I'll get back to it and implement the keybindings display
feature. The trouble is that opening my config file and looking at that
table, is sufficiently painless, that that particular itch doesn't need
much scratching.

> I totally fell in love with it and I'm prolly going to make a
> big mix between mine and yours.

Cool! Makes me happy. I thank you for persuading me to post it.

>>> Oh, thanks, though I'm still used to gmail web interface =(.
>>
>> That's something else that I find unfathomable. Email is essentially
>> text. To deal with it efficiently, I want to use the most efficient tool
>> I have for dealing with text. That would be the text editor I use daily,
>> and whose actions have been imprinting themselves into the core of my
>> nervous system over the course of many years. Regardless of what your
>> choice of editor is, I can't fathom why you would want to relinquish all
>> that in favour of a slow, cumbersome, inefficient, pointy-clickety
>> interface.
>
> I use the hotkeys which helps a bit, but after started using xmonad and then
> pentadactyl reaching the mouse it's a pain that I try to avoid at all costs.

Hmm, so Pentadactyl is the new Vimperator. I'm sure that you can guess
that I use Conkeror: still wouldn't let it anywhere near my mail.

>> OK, maybe managing your mail, as opposed to writing it, is something
>> that only Emacs users would understand/want/appreciate. But *writing*
>> your mail? Surely *everyone* would want to write their mail in their
>> standard text editor, rather than some ad-hoc one. (So that, for
>> example, if you want to prepend the author's initials to each of his
>> quoted lines, there's nothing to wonder about: it just happens
>> naturally.)
>
> Yeah, I somehow do that. In fact this email is being written in a gvim window.
> I use pentadactyl so after a couple of keystrokes (<C-i>) on a textarea throws
> me here.

Te-he. C-i takes me from a Conkeror textarea into Emacs. Still wouldn't
let it anywhere near my email :-)

> The only issue with that is that I still can't make xmonad understand that all
> these windows should be floating and not tiled =/.

Truth be told: I've never understood the point of these floating
windows, or how they actually work in XMonad. (Perhaps I don't make
enough use of stuff like GIMP.) When I get a floating window, it's often
only a matter of seconds before I tile the bugger, out of annoyance.

I'm sure that I could benefit from some education in this respect.

> I wrote in this list a while ago but every attempt to make a "generic"
> declaration with a managehook failed.
>
>> Personally, I just can't stomach any mail interface that is not Embedded
>> in Emacs. But then Emacs is pretty much my OS.
>
> I don't know if I can "embed" a mail interface in vim (I haven't searched), but
> I guess that mutt is the closest thing to that.

Chances are that it's not (sensibly) possible. It's very much an Emacs
cultural thing, to take whatever it is that you do repeatedly, and have
Emacs absorb it. Org-mode is an epic testament to this.

> Anyway, once again I felt motivated to get rid of the gmail web interface :)

I must stop leading you astray. :-)


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How to prefix workspace names with numbers?

Brandon Allbery
On Thu, Oct 11, 2012 at 4:28 PM, Jacek Generowicz
<jacek.generowicz at cern.ch>wrote:

> Incidentally, the immiscibility of XMonad and Aqua was one of, if not
> *the* major reason for me moving back.
>

They're not immiscible, just not as nice as it could be.  I'm running
xmonad on OS X now.  I would like to see Spaces visible to XQuartz as
separate XRandR screens, but I'm not sure how well that would work and
there are limits to what XQuartz can do in adapting between X11 and Core
Graphics.

--
brandon s allbery kf8nh                               sine nomine associates
allbery.b at gmail.com                                  ballbery at sinenomine.net
unix/linux, openafs, kerberos, infrastructure          http://sinenomine.net
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