LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

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LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

John A. De Goes-2

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

 https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

 - LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
 - CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
 - APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
 - USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
 - CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
 - CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
 - EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
 - OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
 - DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
 - EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
 - KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

William Fearon
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.

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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Chris Smith-31
This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
_______________________________________________
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To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
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Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.

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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

John A. De Goes-2

Indeed. While we can all respectfully disagree about whether or not conferences should ban speakers based on their political views, I think we can all agree that homophobic trolling has no place in Haskell Cafe, nor any other professional community.

I’m reminded of this:


Let’s keep things supportive, friendly, and respectful.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






On Jan 11, 2019, at 8:51 AM, Chris Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
http://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.
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To (un)subscribe, modify options or view archives go to:
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Only members subscribed via the mailman list are allowed to post.


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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Jeremiah Peschka
Two things.

1. This William Fearon account has some history of trolling various conferences, mailing lists, and academics and should probably be removed (see https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Dr-William-Fearon-and-why-does-he-keep-emailing-me-grandiose-claims-about-his-position-in-academia)

2. At the risk of going off topic, nosegay is not a homophobic word and refers to a bunch of sweet smelling flowers. Admittedly, the sentence makes zero sense in this context, but there you have it.

Jeremiah Peschka
On Jan 11, 2019, 08:11 -0800, John A. De Goes <[hidden email]>, wrote:

Indeed. While we can all respectfully disagree about whether or not conferences should ban speakers based on their political views, I think we can all agree that homophobic trolling has no place in Haskell Cafe, nor any other professional community.

I’m reminded of this:


Let’s keep things supportive, friendly, and respectful.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






On Jan 11, 2019, at 8:51 AM, Chris Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Brandon Allbery
Actually it's belittling: merely a nosegay, not a full bouquet. (Or to switch idioms, appetizer instead of a meal.)

But yes, this Fearon person has been rather actively trolling the channel of late; I have him filtered as a result.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 11:21 AM Jeremiah Peschka <[hidden email]> wrote:
Two things.

1. This William Fearon account has some history of trolling various conferences, mailing lists, and academics and should probably be removed (see https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Dr-William-Fearon-and-why-does-he-keep-emailing-me-grandiose-claims-about-his-position-in-academia)

2. At the risk of going off topic, nosegay is not a homophobic word and refers to a bunch of sweet smelling flowers. Admittedly, the sentence makes zero sense in this context, but there you have it.

Jeremiah Peschka
On Jan 11, 2019, 08:11 -0800, John A. De Goes <[hidden email]>, wrote:

Indeed. While we can all respectfully disagree about whether or not conferences should ban speakers based on their political views, I think we can all agree that homophobic trolling has no place in Haskell Cafe, nor any other professional community.

I’m reminded of this:


Let’s keep things supportive, friendly, and respectful.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






On Jan 11, 2019, at 8:51 AM, Chris Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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--
brandon s allbery kf8nh

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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Tom Ellis-5
In reply to this post by Jeremiah Peschka
On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 08:21:18AM -0800, Jeremiah Peschka wrote:
> 1.  This William Fearon account has some history of trolling various
> conferences, mailing lists, and academics and should probably be removed
> (see https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Dr-William-Fearon-and-why-does-he-keep-emailing-me-grandiose-claims-about-his-position-in-academia)

Does anyone know who is an administrator for this list?  I can't find
relevant info in any of the obvious places

    https://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe

    https://www.haskell.org/mailing-lists
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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

John A. De Goes-2
In reply to this post by Jeremiah Peschka

On 2: not “nosegay”—maybe I’m being overly sensitive but the only other time I’ve heard “yag”, it was most definitely a derogatory term for “gay”.

Regards,
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 11, 2019, at 9:21 AM, Jeremiah Peschka <[hidden email]> wrote:

Two things.

1. This William Fearon account has some history of trolling various conferences, mailing lists, and academics and should probably be removed (see https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Dr-William-Fearon-and-why-does-he-keep-emailing-me-grandiose-claims-about-his-position-in-academia)

2. At the risk of going off topic, nosegay is not a homophobic word and refers to a bunch of sweet smelling flowers. Admittedly, the sentence makes zero sense in this context, but there you have it.

Jeremiah Peschka
On Jan 11, 2019, 08:11 -0800, John A. De Goes <[hidden email]>, wrote:

Indeed. While we can all respectfully disagree about whether or not conferences should ban speakers based on their political views, I think we can all agree that homophobic trolling has no place in Haskell Cafe, nor any other professional community.

I’m reminded of this:


Let’s keep things supportive, friendly, and respectful.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






On Jan 11, 2019, at 8:51 AM, Chris Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:

This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.

On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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Re: LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Francesco Ariis
In reply to this post by Tom Ellis-5
On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 04:37:29PM +0000, Tom Ellis wrote:
> Does anyone know who is an administrator for this list?  I can't find
> relevant info in any of the obvious places
>
>     https://mail.haskell.org/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
>     https://www.haskell.org/mailing-lists

Both of these should do:

    - haskell.infrastructure at gmail.com or
    - #haskell-infrastructure IRC channel on freenode.org

And please state that on top of writing stupid messages, our troll
sends html-only emails :P
-F
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John A. De Goes" LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

William Fearon
In reply to this post by John A. De Goes-2
 
 
Hey Johnny Dollar why do you holler? I read your email/ I'm a physician, living in London with a background in logic programming and conventional programming languages.  As for the word Yag its a form of advanced Laser eye treatment for blurred vision, and the treatment of cataracts. I deny having recoined/synonymed the word Yag as a derogatory term for homosexuals. I would never highlight it! I would never debase the English language in that way. Taking a centuries old English meadowlark poetic term and misusing it. Although I have to say I prefer lags myself.
 
 
Regards
 
 
Dr William F Fearon
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 at 4:38 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: "Jeremiah Peschka" <[hidden email]>
Cc: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals
 
On 2: not “nosegay”—maybe I’m being overly sensitive but the only other time I’ve heard “yag”, it was most definitely a derogatory term for “gay”.
 
Regards,
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes
 
Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 11, 2019, at 9:21 AM, Jeremiah Peschka <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
 
Two things.
 
1. This William Fearon account has some history of trolling various conferences, mailing lists, and academics and should probably be removed (see https://www.quora.com/Who-is-Dr-William-Fearon-and-why-does-he-keep-emailing-me-grandiose-claims-about-his-position-in-academia)
 
2. At the risk of going off topic, nosegay is not a homophobic word and refers to a bunch of sweet smelling flowers. Admittedly, the sentence makes zero sense in this context, but there you have it.

Jeremiah Peschka
On Jan 11, 2019, 08:11 -0800, John A. De Goes <[hidden email]>, wrote:
 
Indeed. While we can all respectfully disagree about whether or not conferences should ban speakers based on their political views, I think we can all agree that homophobic trolling has no place in Haskell Cafe, nor any other professional community.
 
I’m reminded of this:
 
 
Let’s keep things supportive, friendly, and respectful.
 
Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes
 

 
 
On Jan 11, 2019, at 8:51 AM, Chris Smith <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
This might be a good time to reflect on the kind of community we'd like to build and maintain here.  I understand there's a lot of history behind LambdaConf and questionable decisions about past speakers, but we can still express opinions in a respectful way.
 
On Fri, Jan 11, 2019 at 7:07 AM William Fearon <[hidden email]> wrote:
 
Johnny Dollar I'm way above your nosegay event. Yay, Yag, Yag.
 
 
 
Dr Fearon
Sent: Tuesday, January 08, 2019 at 3:06 PM
From: "John A. De Goes" <[hidden email]>
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [Haskell-cafe] LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Dear Haskell Enthusiasts:

The LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals is open, and we warmly welcome Haskell proposals on topics of interest to aspiring and practicing functional programmers. Historically, Haskell content accounts for more than 50% of content across all 5-8 tracks of the event.

Last year’s speakers included Michael Snoyberg, Dana Scott, Jeremy Siek, and many others from both industry and academia.

To submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019, please visit the following website:

https://www.papercall.io/lambdaconf-2019

Travel assistance is available, including lodging.

## INTRODUCTION

LambdaConf is the largest interdisciplinary functional programming conference in the Mountain West, and one of the largest and most respected functional programming conferences in the world.

The conference takes place June 5rd - 7th, in Boulder, Colorado, at the University of Colorado Boulder, and is surrounded by commercial training opportunities. If you are an educator, a researcher, a speaker, a speaker coach, or someone aspiring to one of the preceding, then we warmly welcome you to submit a proposal for LambdaConf 2019. No prior experience is necessary for most proposals, and we welcome beginner-level content.

The Call for Proposals closes at the end of January 2019. We recommend submitting as early as you can to ensure sufficient time for editing. LambdaConf attracts everyone from the FP-curious to researchers advancing state-of-the-art; hobbyists, professionals, academics and students. Material at all levels, including beginner content and very advanced content, will find an audience at LambdaConf.

Historically, LambdaConf has enjoyed a large selection of sessions on statically-typed functional programming, and a smaller selection of sessions on dynamically-typed functional programming. Some sessions are not tied to specific programming languages, but rather cover topics in abstract algebra, category theory, type theory, programming language theory, functional architecture, and so on, either generically or in a way that applies across many programming languages.

## TOPICS

LambdaConf looks for sessions in the following areas:

- LANGUAGES. Proposals that overview or dive into specific features of functional, math, or logic programming languages (both new and existing), with the goal of exposing developers to new ideas or helping them master features of languages they already know. LIBRARIES. Proposals that discuss libraries that leverage functional or logic programming to help programmers solve real-world problems.
- CONCEPTS. Proposals that discuss functional programming idioms, patterns, or abstractions; or concepts from mathematics, logic, and computer science, all directed at helping developers write software that’s easier to test, easier to reason about, and easier to change safely.
- APPLICATIONS. Proposals that discuss how functional programming can help with specific aspects of modern software development, including scalability, distributed systems, concurrency, data processing, security, performance, correctness, user-interfaces, machine learning, and big data.
- USE CASES. Proposals that discuss how functional programming enabled a project or team to thrive, or deliver more business value than possible with other approaches.
- CHERRY PICKING. Proposals that show how techniques and approaches from functional programming can be adapted and incorporated into mainstream development languages and practices, to the benefit of developers using them.
- CAUTIONARY TALES. Proposals that call attention to difficulties of functional programming (both as a cautionary tale but also to raise awareness), especially such proposals that suggest alternatives or a path forward.
- EFFICACY. Proposals that present data, measurements, or analysis that suggests different techniques, paradigms, languages, libraries, concepts, or approaches have different efficacies for given specified metrics, which provide actionable takeaways to practicing functional and logic programmers.
- OFF-TOPIC. Proposals that have appeal to a mainstream developer audience (the number of off-topic proposals we accept is small, but we do accept some, especially for keynotes).

## SESSION TYPES

LambdaConf accepts proposals for the following types of sessions:

- LEAP WORKSHOPS (6h). Leap Workshops are approximately 6 hours in length. They are in-depth, hands-on workshops designed to teach mainstream functional programming topics in enough detail, attendees can immediately apply what they learn in their jobs. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Leap Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- HOP WORKSHOPS (2h). Hop Workshops are 2 hours in length. Like Leap Workshops, these workshops are in-depth and hands-on, but they cover reduced content and may be specialized to topics that may not have mainstream appeal. We require that speakers follow our recommended format for Hop Workshops, although we allow exceptions for experienced teachers.
- DE NOVO SESSIONS (50m). De Novo Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to present original work from industry and academia. While the requirements for proposals are more rigorous, there is less competition for De Novo slots.
- EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS (50m). Educational Sessions are 50 minutes in length. These sessions are designed to clearly and concisely teach one useful concept, skill, aspect, library, or language to attendees.
- KEYNOTES (40m). Keynotes are 40 minutes in length, and are presented before all attendees (there are no other sessions concurrent with keynotes). Keynotes are designed to offer thought-provoking, opinionated, and insightful commentary on topics of interest to the community.

If you are accepted for a specific type of proposal (e.g. Educational), we cannot guarantee that you will get a slot of this type. Based on scheduling requirements, feedback from the committee, or feedback from your speaker coach, we may require you to change the format of your session.

Regards,
--
John A. De Goes
[hidden email]
Follow me on Twitter @jdegoes






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Re: John A. De Goes" LambdaConf 2019 Call for Proposals

Bardur Arantsson-2
On 11/01/2019 20.21, William Fearon wrote:

[--snip--]

Ok, list admins, can we please ban this Fearon person?

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