MacOS testing?

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

MacOS testing?

Ian Ross
Hi all,

Does anyone know of a good solution for MacOS testing that doesn't cost much?  (Ideally, that costs nothing...)  I've been getting a lot of MacOS-specific issues on the C2HS that I maintain and, since I don't have a Mac myself, testing and fixing these things is a bit of a problem.  There is no equivalent of Amazon's EC2 for MacOS.  There are some hosting services out there, but they're not all that practical, since they cost, they're set up for continuous hosting rather than intermittent use for bug-fixing, and you can't save a machine image snapshot once you've installed all the software you need (as you can on AWS) so you either need to keep your instance running or reinstall everything every time you want to test something.

Any ideas?  The only thought I've had so far was to try to do something horrible using Travis (Kiwamu Okabe has some slides about building and testing Haskell code on Travis: http://www.slideshare.net/master_q/20131109-kof2013-travisciosx).  That's not a good solution for debugging though.

Thanks for any thoughts you might have,

Ian.

--
Ian Ross   Tel: +43(0)6804451378   [hidden email]   www.skybluetrades.net

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: MacOS testing?

Bob Ippolito
Travis is the only free option I'm aware of. As for renting time on a Mac by the hour here's what I could find:


On Saturday, May 31, 2014, Ian Ross <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,

Does anyone know of a good solution for MacOS testing that doesn't cost much?  (Ideally, that costs nothing...)  I've been getting a lot of MacOS-specific issues on the C2HS that I maintain and, since I don't have a Mac myself, testing and fixing these things is a bit of a problem.  There is no equivalent of Amazon's EC2 for MacOS.  There are some hosting services out there, but they're not all that practical, since they cost, they're set up for continuous hosting rather than intermittent use for bug-fixing, and you can't save a machine image snapshot once you've installed all the software you need (as you can on AWS) so you either need to keep your instance running or reinstall everything every time you want to test something.

Any ideas?  The only thought I've had so far was to try to do something horrible using Travis (Kiwamu Okabe has some slides about building and testing Haskell code on Travis: http://www.slideshare.net/master_q/20131109-kof2013-travisciosx).  That's not a good solution for debugging though.

Thanks for any thoughts you might have,

Ian.

--
Ian Ross   Tel: +43(0)6804451378   <a href="javascript:_e(%7B%7D,&#39;cvml&#39;,&#39;ian@skybluetrades.net&#39;);" target="_blank">ian@...   www.skybluetrades.net

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: MacOS testing?

Alp Mestanogullari
In reply to this post by Ian Ross

Ian,

I am running OS X, so let me know if I can run some programs or tests for you.

Le 31 mai 2014 12:44, "Ian Ross" <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Hi all,

Does anyone know of a good solution for MacOS testing that doesn't cost much?  (Ideally, that costs nothing...)  I've been getting a lot of MacOS-specific issues on the C2HS that I maintain and, since I don't have a Mac myself, testing and fixing these things is a bit of a problem.  There is no equivalent of Amazon's EC2 for MacOS.  There are some hosting services out there, but they're not all that practical, since they cost, they're set up for continuous hosting rather than intermittent use for bug-fixing, and you can't save a machine image snapshot once you've installed all the software you need (as you can on AWS) so you either need to keep your instance running or reinstall everything every time you want to test something.

Any ideas?  The only thought I've had so far was to try to do something horrible using Travis (Kiwamu Okabe has some slides about building and testing Haskell code on Travis: http://www.slideshare.net/master_q/20131109-kof2013-travisciosx).  That's not a good solution for debugging though.

Thanks for any thoughts you might have,

Ian.

--
Ian Ross   Tel: <a href="tel:%2B43%280%296804451378" value="+436804451378" target="_blank">+43(0)6804451378   [hidden email]   www.skybluetrades.net

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe