New book: Real-World Haskell!

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New book: Real-World Haskell!

Donald Bruce Stewart

Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

The plan is to cover the major techniques used to write serious,
real-world Haskell code, so that programmers can just get to work in the
language. By the end of the book readers should be able to write real
libraries and applications in Haskell, and be able to:

    * design data structures
    * know how to write, and when to use, monads and monad transformers
    * use Haskells concurrency and parallelism abstractions
    * be able to write parsers for custom formats in Parsec.
    * be able to do IO and binary IO of all forms
    * be able to bind Haskell to foreign functions in C
    * be able to do database, network and gui programming
    * know how to do exception and error handling in Haskell
    * have a good knowledge of the core libraries
    * be able to use the type system to track and prevent errors
    * take advantage of tools like QuickCheck, Cabal and Haddock
    * understand advanced parts of the language, such as GADTs and MPTCs.

That is, you should be able to just write Haskell!

The existing handful of books about Haskell are all aimed at teaching
programming to early undergraduate audiences, so they are ill-suited to
people who already know how to code. And while theres a huge body of
introductory material available on the web, you have to be both
tremendously motivated and skilled to find the good stuff and apply it
to your own learning needs.

The time has come for the advanced, practical Haskell book.

Heres the proposed chapter outline:

   1. Why functional programming? Why Haskell?
   2. Getting started: compiler, interpreter, values, simple functions, and types
   3. Syntax, type system basics, type class basics
   4. Write a real library: the rope data structure, cabal, building projects
   5. Typeclasses and their use
   6. Bringing it all together: file name matching and regular expressions
   7. All about I/O
   8. I/O case study: a DSL for searching the filesystem
   9. Code case study: barcode recognition
  10. Testing the Haskell way: QuickCheck
  11. Handling binary files and formats
  12. Designing and using data structures
  13. Monads
  14. Monad case study: refactoring the filesystem seacher
  15. Monad transformers
  16. Using parsec: parsing a bioinformatics format
  17. Interfacing with C: the FFI
  18. Error handling
  19. Haskell for systems programming
  20. Talking to databases: Data.Typeable
  21. Web client programming: client/server networking
  22. GUI programming: gtk2hs
  23. Data mining and web applications
  24. Basics of concurrent and parallel Haskell
  25. Advanced concurrent and parallel programming
  26. Concurrency case study: a lockless database with STM
  27. Performance and efficiency: profiling
  28. Advanced Haskell: MPTCs, TH, strong typing, GADTs
  29. Appendices

We're seeking technical reviewers from both inside and outside the
Haskell community, to help review and improve the content, with the
intent that this text will become the standard reference for those
seeking to learn serious Haskell. If you'd like to be a reviewer, please
drop us a line at [hidden email], and let us
know a little about your background and areas of interest.

Finally, a very exciting aspect of this project is that O'Reilly has
agreed to publish chapters online, under a Creative Commons License!
Well be publishing chapters incrementally, and seeking feedback from our
reviewers and readers as we go.

You can find more details and updates at the following locations:

    * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
    * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
    * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/

-- Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen.
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Daniel McAllansmith-2
On Wednesday 23 May 2007 19:01, Donald Bruce Stewart wrote:
> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

That's good news, Don.  I look forward to it.

> You can find more details and updates at the following locations:
>
>     * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
>     * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
>     * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/

It might just be me, but I think there's something up with a redirect or
something...

I went to

http://book.realworldhaskell.org/ 

then clicked the link to go to

http://www.realworldhaskell.org/book/ 

I end up at

http://book.realworldhaskell.org//

the extra forward slash isn't a typo.


No biggie, but I thought I'd let you know.


Cheers
Daniel
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Gour-2
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
On Wed, 23 May 2007 17:01:28 +1000
[hidden email] (Donald Bruce Stewart) wrote:

Hi!

Congratualtions for your effort?

> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and
> frankly, very excited to announce that were developing a new book for
> O'Reilly, on practical Haskell programming. The working title is
> Real-World Haskell.

Anticipating great demand for the book and the fact I like to hold
dead-tree version in my hands, I'm interested whether one can pre-order
the book?

I'd not like to miss a copy ;)

Sincerely,
Gour


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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Gour-2
On Wed, 23 May 2007 10:07:29 +0200
Gour <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Congratualtions for your effort?

Oops...it should be !

> Sincerely,
> Gour

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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Dougal Stanton
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
On 23/05/07, Donald Bruce Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

That is fantastic news to hear. I realise this may be jumping the gun
a bit but could you say anything about predicted timelines? Are you
starting from a clean slate or have you been squirrelling away lots of
material already?

Fantastic news, and good luck guys.

Dougal.
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Niko Korhonen
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
Donald Bruce Stewart wrote:
> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

I have absolutely no doubt that I'm gonna love the book :)

-Niko

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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Bugzilla from alfonso.acosta@gmail.com
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
On 5/23/07, Donald Bruce Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

That is simply great! I've been looking forward to read a book like
that for so long.

>   28. Advanced Haskell: MPTCs, TH, strong typing, GADTs

Existential types are a must in this chapter! even more important that
TH and GADTs.
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Henning Thielemann
In reply to this post by Dougal Stanton

On Wed, 23 May 2007, Dougal Stanton wrote:

> On 23/05/07, Donald Bruce Stewart <[hidden email]> wrote:
> >
> > Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> > very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> > practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.

A great idea. I guess there will also be some lines about how to write
efficient code by using ByteString et. al.?

> That is fantastic news to hear. I realise this may be jumping the gun
> a bit but could you say anything about predicted timelines? Are you
> starting from a clean slate or have you been squirrelling away lots of
> material already?

What about a public darcs repository where people can constantly download
and review modifications? People could even send patches to the authors
(editors?).
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Hans van Thiel
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
On Wed, 2007-05-23 at 17:01 +1000, Donald Bruce Stewart wrote:

> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.
>
> The plan is to cover the major techniques used to write serious,
> real-world Haskell code, so that programmers can just get to work in the
> language. By the end of the book readers should be able to write real
> libraries and applications in Haskell, and be able to:
>
>     * design data structures
>     * know how to write, and when to use, monads and monad transformers
>     * use Haskells concurrency and parallelism abstractions
>     * be able to write parsers for custom formats in Parsec.
>     * be able to do IO and binary IO of all forms
>     * be able to bind Haskell to foreign functions in C
>     * be able to do database, network and gui programming
>     * know how to do exception and error handling in Haskell
>     * have a good knowledge of the core libraries
>     * be able to use the type system to track and prevent errors
>     * take advantage of tools like QuickCheck, Cabal and Haddock
>     * understand advanced parts of the language, such as GADTs and MPTCs.
>
> That is, you should be able to just write Haskell!
>
> The existing handful of books about Haskell are all aimed at teaching
> programming to early undergraduate audiences, so they are ill-suited to
> people who already know how to code. And while theres a huge body of
> introductory material available on the web, you have to be both
> tremendously motivated and skilled to find the good stuff and apply it
> to your own learning needs.
>
> The time has come for the advanced, practical Haskell book.
Great, this surely meets a demand and I'll buy it, for sure.

Here's my wish list:
>
> Heres the proposed chapter outline:
>
>    1. Why functional programming? Why Haskell?
Compared to Erlang. While other functional languages are mentioned
occoasionally on this list, Erlang is notably absent. This while the
Erlang processes seem to be very useful, especially for concurrency and
embedded systems programming. Is Haskell useful for embedded systems at
all?

>    2. Getting started: compiler, interpreter, values, simple functions, and types
>    3. Syntax, type system basics, type class basics
>    4. Write a real library: the rope data structure, cabal, building projects
>    5. Typeclasses and their use
>    6. Bringing it all together: file name matching and regular expressions
>    7. All about I/O
>    8. I/O case study: a DSL for searching the filesystem
>    9. Code case study: barcode recognition
>   10. Testing the Haskell way: QuickCheck
>   11. Handling binary files and formats
>   12. Designing and using data structures
>   13. Monads
>   14. Monad case study: refactoring the filesystem seacher
>   15. Monad transformers
>   16. Using parsec: parsing a bioinformatics format
All great!
>   17. Interfacing with C: the FFI
Number two on my wish list: interfacing with Java. Not because of the
language, but the many libraries. For instance, there is a Java library
to interface with the open document format, something I'd like to do. I
know there is a Haskell Java interface, but it seems to be outside of
the mainstream and hardly documented. Or am I wrong?
>   18. Error handling
>   19. Haskell for systems programming
>   20. Talking to databases: Data.Typeable
Yes.
>   21. Web client programming: client/server networking
>   22. GUI programming: gtk2hs
>   23. Data mining and web applications
>   24. Basics of concurrent and parallel Haskell
>   25. Advanced concurrent and parallel programming
>   26. Concurrency case study: a lockless database with STM
>   27. Performance and efficiency: profiling
>   28. Advanced Haskell: MPTCs, TH, strong typing, GADTs
>   29. Appendices
Number one on my wish list: maybe this will be covered in the chapters
so far, but what about lazy versus strict? I understand the importance
of laziness to define infinite lists and other data structures, but not
the impact on performance and what to look out for when writing code.
Similarly safe and unsafe and memoization. Could this be a separate
chapter?
>
> We're seeking technical reviewers from both inside and outside the
> Haskell community, to help review and improve the content, with the
> intent that this text will become the standard reference for those
> seeking to learn serious Haskell.
A critical note here. Before you can learn 'serious' Haskell you'll have
to learn basic Haskell. I'm sure it is unintentional, but avoid any
impression of superiority. Writing a good text book is very hard and
very time consuming, and succesful communication with an audience is a
separate skill. How about 'Applying Haskell' or something like that as
the working title; what is the 'real world' anyway?

But I'll be looking forward to the book, whatever its name!

Regards,

Hans van Thiel

> If you'd like to be a reviewer, please
> drop us a line at [hidden email], and let us
> know a little about your background and areas of interest.
>
> Finally, a very exciting aspect of this project is that O'Reilly has
> agreed to publish chapters online, under a Creative Commons License!
> Well be publishing chapters incrementally, and seeking feedback from our
> reviewers and readers as we go.
>
> You can find more details and updates at the following locations:
>
>     * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
>     * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
>     * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/
>
> -- Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen.
>

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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Andrew Coppin
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart

> The plan is to cover the major techniques used to write serious,
> real-world Haskell code, so that programmers can just get to work in the
> language.

Amen to that! Too many people seem to think Hasekll is some sort of
"pretend language" that is only useful for defining quicksort and other
trivial excersises in CS.

> By the end of the book readers should be able to write real
> libraries and applications in Haskell, and be able to:
>
>     * design data structures
>     * know how to write, and when to use, monads and monad transformers
>     * use Haskells concurrency and parallelism abstractions
>     * be able to write parsers for custom formats in Parsec.
>     * be able to do IO and binary IO of all forms
>     * be able to bind Haskell to foreign functions in C
>     * be able to do database, network and gui programming
>     * know how to do exception and error handling in Haskell
>     * have a good knowledge of the core libraries
>     * be able to use the type system to track and prevent errors
>     * take advantage of tools like QuickCheck, Cabal and Haddock
>     * understand advanced parts of the language, such as GADTs and MPTCs.
>
> That is, you should be able to just write Haskell!
>  

Hmm, interesting. I didn't know half of that stuff was *possible*! o_O

> Heres the proposed chapter outline:
>  

That's a fairly impressive loadout - if it ever happens...

Hope you guys have *a lot* of time to finish all that! ;-)

> You can find more details and updates at the following locations:
>
>     * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
>     * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
>     * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/
>  

I will be watching this one with some interest...

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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Dan Weston
In reply to this post by Donald Bruce Stewart
What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly book?
Alas, most of the good ones are gone already!

Donald Bruce Stewart wrote:

> Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.
>
> The plan is to cover the major techniques used to write serious,
> real-world Haskell code, so that programmers can just get to work in the
> language. By the end of the book readers should be able to write real
> libraries and applications in Haskell, and be able to:
>
>     * design data structures
>     * know how to write, and when to use, monads and monad transformers
>     * use Haskells concurrency and parallelism abstractions
>     * be able to write parsers for custom formats in Parsec.
>     * be able to do IO and binary IO of all forms
>     * be able to bind Haskell to foreign functions in C
>     * be able to do database, network and gui programming
>     * know how to do exception and error handling in Haskell
>     * have a good knowledge of the core libraries
>     * be able to use the type system to track and prevent errors
>     * take advantage of tools like QuickCheck, Cabal and Haddock
>     * understand advanced parts of the language, such as GADTs and MPTCs.
>
> That is, you should be able to just write Haskell!
>
> The existing handful of books about Haskell are all aimed at teaching
> programming to early undergraduate audiences, so they are ill-suited to
> people who already know how to code. And while theres a huge body of
> introductory material available on the web, you have to be both
> tremendously motivated and skilled to find the good stuff and apply it
> to your own learning needs.
>
> The time has come for the advanced, practical Haskell book.
>
> Heres the proposed chapter outline:
>
>    1. Why functional programming? Why Haskell?
>    2. Getting started: compiler, interpreter, values, simple functions, and types
>    3. Syntax, type system basics, type class basics
>    4. Write a real library: the rope data structure, cabal, building projects
>    5. Typeclasses and their use
>    6. Bringing it all together: file name matching and regular expressions
>    7. All about I/O
>    8. I/O case study: a DSL for searching the filesystem
>    9. Code case study: barcode recognition
>   10. Testing the Haskell way: QuickCheck
>   11. Handling binary files and formats
>   12. Designing and using data structures
>   13. Monads
>   14. Monad case study: refactoring the filesystem seacher
>   15. Monad transformers
>   16. Using parsec: parsing a bioinformatics format
>   17. Interfacing with C: the FFI
>   18. Error handling
>   19. Haskell for systems programming
>   20. Talking to databases: Data.Typeable
>   21. Web client programming: client/server networking
>   22. GUI programming: gtk2hs
>   23. Data mining and web applications
>   24. Basics of concurrent and parallel Haskell
>   25. Advanced concurrent and parallel programming
>   26. Concurrency case study: a lockless database with STM
>   27. Performance and efficiency: profiling
>   28. Advanced Haskell: MPTCs, TH, strong typing, GADTs
>   29. Appendices
>
> We're seeking technical reviewers from both inside and outside the
> Haskell community, to help review and improve the content, with the
> intent that this text will become the standard reference for those
> seeking to learn serious Haskell. If you'd like to be a reviewer, please
> drop us a line at [hidden email], and let us
> know a little about your background and areas of interest.
>
> Finally, a very exciting aspect of this project is that O'Reilly has
> agreed to publish chapters online, under a Creative Commons License!
> Well be publishing chapters incrementally, and seeking feedback from our
> reviewers and readers as we go.
>
> You can find more details and updates at the following locations:
>
>     * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
>     * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
>     * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/
>
> -- Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen.
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
>


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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Tom Harper
I really hope they choose the flying squirrel.

On 5/23/07, Dan Weston <[hidden email]> wrote:

> What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly book?
> Alas, most of the good ones are gone already!
>
> Donald Bruce Stewart wrote:
> > Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen are pleased, and frankly,
> > very excited to announce that were developing a new book for O'Reilly, on
> > practical Haskell programming. The working title is Real-World Haskell.
> >
> > The plan is to cover the major techniques used to write serious,
> > real-world Haskell code, so that programmers can just get to work in the
> > language. By the end of the book readers should be able to write real
> > libraries and applications in Haskell, and be able to:
> >
> >     * design data structures
> >     * know how to write, and when to use, monads and monad transformers
> >     * use Haskells concurrency and parallelism abstractions
> >     * be able to write parsers for custom formats in Parsec.
> >     * be able to do IO and binary IO of all forms
> >     * be able to bind Haskell to foreign functions in C
> >     * be able to do database, network and gui programming
> >     * know how to do exception and error handling in Haskell
> >     * have a good knowledge of the core libraries
> >     * be able to use the type system to track and prevent errors
> >     * take advantage of tools like QuickCheck, Cabal and Haddock
> >     * understand advanced parts of the language, such as GADTs and MPTCs.
> >
> > That is, you should be able to just write Haskell!
> >
> > The existing handful of books about Haskell are all aimed at teaching
> > programming to early undergraduate audiences, so they are ill-suited to
> > people who already know how to code. And while theres a huge body of
> > introductory material available on the web, you have to be both
> > tremendously motivated and skilled to find the good stuff and apply it
> > to your own learning needs.
> >
> > The time has come for the advanced, practical Haskell book.
> >
> > Heres the proposed chapter outline:
> >
> >    1. Why functional programming? Why Haskell?
> >    2. Getting started: compiler, interpreter, values, simple functions, and types
> >    3. Syntax, type system basics, type class basics
> >    4. Write a real library: the rope data structure, cabal, building projects
> >    5. Typeclasses and their use
> >    6. Bringing it all together: file name matching and regular expressions
> >    7. All about I/O
> >    8. I/O case study: a DSL for searching the filesystem
> >    9. Code case study: barcode recognition
> >   10. Testing the Haskell way: QuickCheck
> >   11. Handling binary files and formats
> >   12. Designing and using data structures
> >   13. Monads
> >   14. Monad case study: refactoring the filesystem seacher
> >   15. Monad transformers
> >   16. Using parsec: parsing a bioinformatics format
> >   17. Interfacing with C: the FFI
> >   18. Error handling
> >   19. Haskell for systems programming
> >   20. Talking to databases: Data.Typeable
> >   21. Web client programming: client/server networking
> >   22. GUI programming: gtk2hs
> >   23. Data mining and web applications
> >   24. Basics of concurrent and parallel Haskell
> >   25. Advanced concurrent and parallel programming
> >   26. Concurrency case study: a lockless database with STM
> >   27. Performance and efficiency: profiling
> >   28. Advanced Haskell: MPTCs, TH, strong typing, GADTs
> >   29. Appendices
> >
> > We're seeking technical reviewers from both inside and outside the
> > Haskell community, to help review and improve the content, with the
> > intent that this text will become the standard reference for those
> > seeking to learn serious Haskell. If you'd like to be a reviewer, please
> > drop us a line at [hidden email], and let us
> > know a little about your background and areas of interest.
> >
> > Finally, a very exciting aspect of this project is that O'Reilly has
> > agreed to publish chapters online, under a Creative Commons License!
> > Well be publishing chapters incrementally, and seeking feedback from our
> > reviewers and readers as we go.
> >
> > You can find more details and updates at the following locations:
> >
> >     * The web site, http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/welcome/
> >     * The authors,  http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/about/
> >     * The blog,     http://www.realworldhaskell.org/blog/
> >
> > -- Bryan O'Sullivan, Don Stewart and John Goerzen.
> > _______________________________________________
> > Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> > [hidden email]
> > http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
> >
> >
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>


--
Tom Harper
Computer Science Major '07
Syracuse University
+1 949 235 0185
Public Key: http://aftereternity.co.uk/rth.asc
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

brad clawsie-2
In reply to this post by Dan Weston
On Wed, May 23, 2007 at 12:40:58PM -0700, Dan Weston wrote:
>  What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly book? Alas,
>  most of the good ones are gone already!

"lamb"-da?
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Michael Vanier
That's pretty baa-aa-aad.

Mike

brad clawsie wrote:
> On Wed, May 23, 2007 at 12:40:58PM -0700, Dan Weston wrote:
>>  What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly book? Alas,
>>  most of the good ones are gone already!
>
> "lamb"-da?
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
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> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Creighton Hogg-4
In reply to this post by Tom Harper


On 5/23/07, Tom Harper <[hidden email]> wrote:
I really hope they choose the flying squirrel.


They should just use that picture of Philip Wadler as Lambda-Man.



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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Scott Cruzen
In reply to this post by Dan Weston
* Dan Weston <[hidden email]> [070523 12:41]:
>  What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly book? Alas,
>  most of the good ones are gone already!

I'd like to suggest the Mantis shrimp because they have excellent
vision, they're long lived and they pack a punch.

I haven't checked, but it's almost certainly not already used.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis_shrimp
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Bryan O'Sullivan
In reply to this post by Dougal Stanton
Dougal Stanton wrote:

> That is fantastic news to hear. I realise this may be jumping the gun
> a bit but could you say anything about predicted timelines?

Not just yet, but it will be a much faster process with three seasoned
verbmonkeys at work than if we had just one.

> Are you
> starting from a clean slate or have you been squirrelling away lots of
> material already?

A bit of both.

        <b
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Bryan O'Sullivan
In reply to this post by Henning Thielemann
I'll condense my remaining replies to this thread into a single message,
to save people a little noise.

Henning Thielemann:

> I guess there will also be some lines about how to write
> efficient code by using ByteString et. al.?

You bet!

> What about a public darcs repository where people can constantly download
> and review modifications?   People could even send patches to the authors (editors?).

We'll certainly consider those possibilities.  I don't know how our
publisher will feel about them, but they've been great so far.

Alfonso Acosta:

> Existential types are a must  [...]

Yes, we'll be sure to cover existentials.  Thanks for the nudge (and
ndm, and others too).

Hans van Thiel:

> Compared to Erlang. While other functional languages are mentioned
> occoasionally on this list, Erlang is notably absent.

I'm reluctant to do comparisons with other languages; that's too easy to
interpret as evangelism, a game I don't want to play.  It also invites
the plaintive cry that someone's favourite language was dissed through
omission.

> Number two on my wish list: interfacing with Java.

The temptation to cover new and exciting material is of course strong.
LambdaVM is both, but it's also an in-progress one-person master's
project.  We think we'd do best to focus on libraries and extensions
that are either distributed as standard or widely used.

> How about 'Applying Haskell' or something like that as
> the working title; what is the 'real world' anyway?

The details may vary, but it's roughly this:

newtype IO a = IO (State# RealWorld -> (# State# RealWorld, a #))

:-)

        <b
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Brian Alliet
On Wed, May 23, 2007 at 10:48:38PM -0700, Bryan O'Sullivan wrote:
> >Number two on my wish list: interfacing with Java.
>
> The temptation to cover new and exciting material is of course strong.
> LambdaVM is both, but it's also an in-progress one-person master's
> project.  We think we'd do best to focus on libraries and extensions
> that are either distributed as standard or widely used.

I think he was probably talking about this:

http://semantic.org/jvm-bridge/

which is much more widely used than LambdaVM.

Thanks for the LambdaVM plug though.

-Brian
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Re: New book: Real-World Haskell!

Magnus Therning
In reply to this post by Scott Cruzen
On Wed, May 23, 2007 at 15:22:05 -0700, Scott Cruzen wrote:

>* Dan Weston <[hidden email]> [070523 12:41]:
>>  What power animal have you chosen for the cover of your O'Reilly
>>  book? Alas, most of the good ones are gone already!
>
>I'd like to suggest the Mantis shrimp because they have excellent
>vision, they're long lived and they pack a punch.
>
>I haven't checked, but it's almost certainly not already used.
>
>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mantis_shrimp
They have their menagerie online[1] so it's easy to check what animals
that have been used already.  Personally I think a sloth would be suited
for a lazy language like Haskell :-)

/M

[1]: http://www.oreilly.com/animals.html

--
Magnus Therning                             (OpenPGP: 0xAB4DFBA4)
[hidden email]             Jabber: [hidden email]
http://therning.org/magnus

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