PhD program at Portland State accepting applications for Fall 2012

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PhD program at Portland State accepting applications for Fall 2012

Nathan Collins
Hi,

Portland State University has a lot going on in functional
programming.  The Fall 2012 PhD program application deadline is March
1 for US students and February 1 for international students:

http://cs.pdx.edu/programs/admissions

FP related work at Portland:

- Tim Sheard is working on the Trellys project: design and
implementation (in Haskell) of a "practical" dependently typed
programming language.  Joint project with Aaron Stump at UIowa and
Stephanie Weirich at UPenn.  Here "practical" means intended for
programming more than for theorem proving.  Supports theorem proving,
but also logically dubious features like general recursion and Type in
Type.  The key design issue is the interplay between safe and unsafe
features.  Project repo:

https://code.google.com/p/trellys/

- Andrew Tolmach, Mark Jones, and James Hook are working on HASP:
design and implementation (in Haskell) of a functional programming
language for high-assurance systems programming.  Project page:

http://hasp.cs.pdx.edu/

- Sergio Antoy is working on narrowing in functional logic programming
and the Curry FLP language.  Intro to functional logic programming:

http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~antoy/homepage/publications/cacm/paper.pdf

PAKCS Curry implementation:

http://www.informatik.uni-kiel.de/~pakcs/

- Arthur Peters, a student of Sergio’s, is working on a new
implementation of Curry based on a simplified graph rewriting model of
functional logic computation. A paper about it and the prototype
implementation are available at:

http://web.cecs.pdx.edu/~amp4/vialois

- Andrew Black is a co-author on a recent paper on Haskell for the Cloud:

https://research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/simonpj/papers/parallel/

Other FP resources in Portland:

- Galois, located a half mile from the computer science department,
hosts many "Tech Talks", open to the public:

http://corp.galois.com/blog/

- Functional programming study group:

http://pdxfunc.org/

Living in Portland:

- Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
and street food:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)

Cheers,

-nathan (PhD student in programming languages)

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black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

Henning Thielemann

On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Nathan Collins wrote:

> - Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
> and street food:
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)

Maybe it is only a JavaScript trick. In Firefox (with JavaScript) I see
the complete a page before it is overwritten by the protest page. In
Konqueror of KDE 3 (with and without JavaScript) I can read the Wiki pages
without problems. Edit however is really disabled. Sometimes I am glad to
have the old technology available. :-)


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Re: black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

Brandon Allbery
On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 12:37, Henning Thielemann <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Nathan Collins wrote:
- Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
and street food:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)

Maybe it is only a JavaScript trick. In Firefox (with JavaScript) I see the complete a page before

Yes, it's being done in JavaScript so people who need to can get around it; also, the mobile site is working normally.

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Re: black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

MigMit
In reply to this post by Henning Thielemann

On 18 Jan 2012, at 21:37, Henning Thielemann wrote:

>
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Nathan Collins wrote:
>
>> - Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
>> and street food:
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)
>
> Maybe it is only a JavaScript trick. In Firefox (with JavaScript) I see the complete a page before it is overwritten by the protest page. In Konqueror of KDE 3 (with and without JavaScript) I can read the Wiki pages without problems. Edit however is really disabled. Sometimes I am glad to have the old technology available. :-)

Well, I must admit, they succeeded in making me install AdBlock - just to block this banner (it really is a JavaScript trick).
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Re: black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

Andrew Butterfield
In reply to this post by Henning Thielemann
Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page

On 18 Jan 2012, at 17:37, Henning Thielemann wrote:

>
> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Nathan Collins wrote:
>
>> - Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
>> and street food:
>>
>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)
>
> Maybe it is only a JavaScript trick. In Firefox (with JavaScript) I see the complete a page before it is overwritten by the protest page. In Konqueror of KDE 3 (with and without JavaScript) I can read the Wiki pages without problems. Edit however is really disabled. Sometimes I am glad to have the old technology available. :-)
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe

--------------------------------------------------------------------
Andrew Butterfield     Tel: +353-1-896-2517     Fax: +353-1-677-2204
Lero@TCD, Head of Foundations & Methods Research Group
Director of Teaching and Learning - Undergraduate,
School of Computer Science and Statistics,
Room G.39, O'Reilly Institute, Trinity College, University of Dublin
                          http://www.scss.tcd.ie/Andrew.Butterfield/
--------------------------------------------------------------------


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Re: black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

Hans Aberg-2
On 18 Jan 2012, at 18:49, Andrew Butterfield wrote:

> Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page

Or stop the loading before the banner comes up.

Hans


> On 18 Jan 2012, at 17:37, Henning Thielemann wrote:
>
>>
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Nathan Collins wrote:
>>
>>> - Portland is a very popular US city, known for beer, bikes, music,
>>> and street food:
>>>
>>> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portland_Oregon (wikipedia is blacked out today)
>>
>> Maybe it is only a JavaScript trick. In Firefox (with JavaScript) I see the complete a page before it is overwritten by the protest page. In Konqueror of KDE 3 (with and without JavaScript) I can read the Wiki pages without problems. Edit however is really disabled. Sometimes I am glad to have the old technology available. :-)



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Re: black Wikipedia

Henning Thielemann
In reply to this post by Andrew Butterfield

On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Andrew Butterfield wrote:

> Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page

Maybe the intention was to demonstrate that censorship (in this case
self-censorship) is mostly a problem for average users but not for
advanced users.

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Re: black Wikipedia

Brandon Allbery
On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 13:11, Henning Thielemann <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Andrew Butterfield wrote:
Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page

Maybe the intention was to demonstrate that censorship (in this case self-censorship) is mostly a problem for average users but not for advanced users.

There isn't going to be a disable-javascript or ?banner hack when anyone anywhere can force a website to be redirected to some DOJ page without providing any proof.  (Yes, really.)

--
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Re: black Wikipedia

John Meacham
Not to mention ebay, craigslist, etc..
http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111005/10082416208/monster-cable-claims-ebay-craigslist-costco-sears-are-rogue-sites.shtml

when there is no burden of proof for someone to take down a site then
things get very complicated.

for instance this package could be enough to get all of hackage taken
down since astrolabe decided they own timezone data[1].

http://hackage.haskell.org/package/timezone-olson-0.1.2

in fact, SOPA and PIPA would make hackage pretty impossible to legally
host. Unless the hackage maintainers want to do exhaustive patent and
copyright searches on all uploaded code before they allow it to be
posted.

[1] http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111006/11532316235/astrolabe-claims-it-holds-copyright-timezone-data-sues-maintainers-public-timezone-database.shtml

   John



On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 10:17 AM, Brandon Allbery <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 13:11, Henning Thielemann
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Andrew Butterfield wrote:
>>>
>>> Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page
>>
>>
>> Maybe the intention was to demonstrate that censorship (in this case
>> self-censorship) is mostly a problem for average users but not for advanced
>> users.
>
>
> There isn't going to be a disable-javascript or ?banner hack when anyone
> anywhere can force a website to be redirected to some DOJ page without
> providing any proof.  (Yes, really.)
>
> --
> brandon s allbery                                      [hidden email]
> wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412) 475-9364 vm/sms
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>

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Re: black Wikipedia (Was: PhD program at Portland State accepting applications)

amindfv
In reply to this post by MigMit
On 1/18/12, MigMit <[hidden email]> wrote:
[..]
> (it really is a JavaScript trick).


In the interest of Wikipedia-style fact-citation, here's a quote from Wikipedia:
"During the blackout, Wikipedia is accessible on mobile devices and
smart phones. You can also view Wikipedia normally by disabling
JavaScript in your browser, as explained on this Technical FAQ page.
Our purpose here isn't to make it completely impossible for people to
read Wikipedia, and it's okay for you to circumvent the blackout. We
just want to make sure you see our message. "
(Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:SOPA_initiative/Learn_more)

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Re: black Wikipedia

Hans Aberg-2
In reply to this post by John Meacham

On 18 Jan 2012, at 19:32, John Meacham wrote:

> Not to mention ebay, craigslist, etc..
> http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111005/10082416208/monster-cable-claims-ebay-craigslist-costco-sears-are-rogue-sites.shtml
>
> when there is no burden of proof for someone to take down a site then
> things get very complicated.
>
> for instance this package could be enough to get all of hackage taken
> down since astrolabe decided they own timezone data[1].
>
> http://hackage.haskell.org/package/timezone-olson-0.1.2

There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.

Hans


> in fact, SOPA and PIPA would make hackage pretty impossible to legally
> host. Unless the hackage maintainers want to do exhaustive patent and
> copyright searches on all uploaded code before they allow it to be
> posted.
>
> [1] http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20111006/11532316235/astrolabe-claims-it-holds-copyright-timezone-data-sues-maintainers-public-timezone-database.shtml
>
>   John
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 10:17 AM, Brandon Allbery <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 13:11, Henning Thielemann
>> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>>
>>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Andrew Butterfield wrote:
>>>>
>>>> Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page
>>>
>>>
>>> Maybe the intention was to demonstrate that censorship (in this case
>>> self-censorship) is mostly a problem for average users but not for advanced
>>> users.
>>
>>
>> There isn't going to be a disable-javascript or ?banner hack when anyone
>> anywhere can force a website to be redirected to some DOJ page without
>> providing any proof.  (Yes, really.)
>>
>> --
>> brandon s allbery                                      [hidden email]
>> wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412) 475-9364 vm/sms
>>
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
>> [hidden email]
>> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe


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Re: black Wikipedia

Brandon Allbery
On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 15:20, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.

But such judgments are rare, sadly.  And for every Beastie Boys case there's at least one The Verve case.

--
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Re: black Wikipedia

David Thomas
In reply to this post by Brandon Allbery
My understanding is that blocking/redirection is to be done at the DNS
level.  In which case, there *is* a "?banner" hack of sorts - get the
IP by some other means.

Which is not to say we should be significantly less concerned.

On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 10:17 AM, Brandon Allbery <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 13:11, Henning Thielemann
> <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> On Wed, 18 Jan 2012, Andrew Butterfield wrote:
>>>
>>> Just add ?banner=none to the url if you really have to read the page
>>
>>
>> Maybe the intention was to demonstrate that censorship (in this case
>> self-censorship) is mostly a problem for average users but not for advanced
>> users.
>
>
> There isn't going to be a disable-javascript or ?banner hack when anyone
> anywhere can force a website to be redirected to some DOJ page without
> providing any proof.  (Yes, really.)
>
> --
> brandon s allbery                                      [hidden email]
> wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412) 475-9364 vm/sms
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>

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Re: black Wikipedia

Brandon Allbery
On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 17:15, David Thomas <[hidden email]> wrote:
My understanding is that blocking/redirection is to be done at the DNS
level.  In which case, there *is* a "?banner" hack of sorts - get the
IP by some other means.

Sadly name-based virtual hosts require a bit more work than that...

--
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Re: black Wikipedia

David Thomas
Granted, but nothing a technical user can't handle, which was the
earlier question.

On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 2:18 PM, Brandon Allbery <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 17:15, David Thomas <[hidden email]>
> wrote:
>>
>> My understanding is that blocking/redirection is to be done at the DNS
>> level.  In which case, there *is* a "?banner" hack of sorts - get the
>> IP by some other means.
>
>
> Sadly name-based virtual hosts require a bit more work than that...
>
> --
> brandon s allbery                                      [hidden email]
> wandering unix systems administrator (available)     (412) 475-9364 vm/sms
>

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Re: black Wikipedia

Hans Aberg-2
In reply to this post by Brandon Allbery
On 18 Jan 2012, at 23:11, Brandon Allbery wrote:

>> There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.
>
> But such judgments are rare, sadly.  And for every Beastie Boys case there's at least one The Verve case.

I did not know that. But it was a UK case, wasn't it? - UK copyright laws are a lot more tight.

Hans



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Re: black Wikipedia

John Meacham
And such a thing can take months or years for the courts to figure
out, and unless your free site has a lawyer to fight for your side,
under SOPA/PIPA you can be down the entire time with little recourse.
For anyone hosting content lke hackage, github, etc. when you have
thousands of packages, someone somewhere is going to be upset by
something and will be able to take the site down. _regardless of the
merit of their case_ the site will go down as they figure it out. Not
only that, they would be able to take the site down if it contains a
link to an objectionable site. for instance, if one of the homepage
fields in some cabal file  somewhere pointed to a site that someone
took offense too on it. we would not only be obligated to patrol the
code uploaded, but the targets of any urls within said
code/description... and retroactively remove stuff if said links
change to contain objectional material. (for a very vauge definition
of objectionable). it is a really messed up law.

    John

On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:

> On 18 Jan 2012, at 23:11, Brandon Allbery wrote:
>
>>> There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.
>>
>> But such judgments are rare, sadly.  And for every Beastie Boys case there's at least one The Verve case.
>
> I did not know that. But it was a UK case, wasn't it? - UK copyright laws are a lot more tight.
>
> Hans
>
>

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Re: black Wikipedia

Hans Aberg-2
Actually, it is a battle between the Hollywood and Silicon Valley industries.

Hans


On 19 Jan 2012, at 00:11, John Meacham wrote:

> And such a thing can take months or years for the courts to figure
> out, and unless your free site has a lawyer to fight for your side,
> under SOPA/PIPA you can be down the entire time with little recourse.
> For anyone hosting content lke hackage, github, etc. when you have
> thousands of packages, someone somewhere is going to be upset by
> something and will be able to take the site down. _regardless of the
> merit of their case_ the site will go down as they figure it out. Not
> only that, they would be able to take the site down if it contains a
> link to an objectionable site. for instance, if one of the homepage
> fields in some cabal file  somewhere pointed to a site that someone
> took offense too on it. we would not only be obligated to patrol the
> code uploaded, but the targets of any urls within said
> code/description... and retroactively remove stuff if said links
> change to contain objectional material. (for a very vauge definition
> of objectionable). it is a really messed up law.
>
>    John
>
> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> On 18 Jan 2012, at 23:11, Brandon Allbery wrote:
>>
>>>> There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.
>>>
>>> But such judgments are rare, sadly.  And for every Beastie Boys case there's at least one The Verve case.
>>
>> I did not know that. But it was a UK case, wasn't it? - UK copyright laws are a lot more tight.
>>
>> Hans
>>
>>


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Re: black Wikipedia

John Meacham
However the fallout is likely to destroy both open source and resale
on the internet.

For instance, the existence of this is enough to get hackage a
takedown under SOPA.
http://hackage.haskell.org/package/conjure

now, you might say we can just move hackage out of the US, but then
any site that _links_ to hackage from within the US will then be
subject to takedown from within the US, and any US based search engine
would be unable to index hackage or return results to it, until
hackage hired a lawyer to prove they don't fascilitate piracy. And I
am not even sure they would win, providing a bittorrent client is
fascilitting piracy because it can be used as a piratebay client.
supporting piracy is transitive under SOPA. think freshmeat.net,
slashdot.org, github, basically any site that links to user content
can be shut down. And haskell.org won't be able to link to it without
also falling prey to SOPA. it's transitive.

Not only that, but the proponents are not just hollywood, it is anyone
that feels they will have an advantage with the ability to bully
internet sites. For instance, monster cable is a huge supporter and
they have a history of suing any site that posts bad reviews of their
products or anyone that uses the words 'monster' or 'cable'. under
SOPA they could just get the sites they want shut down until they
capitulate. Silicon Valley need not fear this sort of thing too much
as they can bite back with lawyers of their own, but independent sites
will find themselves shut off or delisted and sites linking to them
shut down.

    John

On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 3:42 PM, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Actually, it is a battle between the Hollywood and Silicon Valley industries.
>
> Hans
>
>
> On 19 Jan 2012, at 00:11, John Meacham wrote:
>
>> And such a thing can take months or years for the courts to figure
>> out, and unless your free site has a lawyer to fight for your side,
>> under SOPA/PIPA you can be down the entire time with little recourse.
>> For anyone hosting content lke hackage, github, etc. when you have
>> thousands of packages, someone somewhere is going to be upset by
>> something and will be able to take the site down. _regardless of the
>> merit of their case_ the site will go down as they figure it out. Not
>> only that, they would be able to take the site down if it contains a
>> link to an objectionable site. for instance, if one of the homepage
>> fields in some cabal file  somewhere pointed to a site that someone
>> took offense too on it. we would not only be obligated to patrol the
>> code uploaded, but the targets of any urls within said
>> code/description... and retroactively remove stuff if said links
>> change to contain objectional material. (for a very vauge definition
>> of objectionable). it is a really messed up law.
>>
>>    John
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 2:46 PM, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> On 18 Jan 2012, at 23:11, Brandon Allbery wrote:
>>>
>>>>> There is the Beastie Boys case, where the judge decided copyright protects what is creatively unique.
>>>>
>>>> But such judgments are rare, sadly.  And for every Beastie Boys case there's at least one The Verve case.
>>>
>>> I did not know that. But it was a UK case, wasn't it? - UK copyright laws are a lot more tight.
>>>
>>> Hans
>>>
>>>
>

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Re: black Wikipedia

Austin Seipp
In reply to this post by Hans Aberg-2
Aside from being a horrible oversimplification of the matter (because
it's *never* that simple - Wikipedia is not in this movement for
commercial interest or the side of SV/HW, but because it opposes the
censoring of the internet; neither are people like Dan Kaminsky, who
are also opposing from the point of the large-scale security
ramifications due to the subversion of DNS' universal nature,) and the
grounds at stake extending far beyond either SV or Hollywood [1] - I
don't really think boiling it down to 2 contenders is terribly
important: It passes, and we lose. Or we'll end up having to fight an
even tougher battle.

"This bill cannot be fixed; it must be killed." - The EFF

On Wed, Jan 18, 2012 at 5:42 PM, Hans Aberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Actually, it is a battle between the Hollywood and Silicon Valley industries.
>
> Hans
>

[1] It will cause substantial damage to large number of existing jobs
in plenty of places as a result of massive amounts of litigation, it
will stunt investment in anything which could potentially suffer from
such litigation, it sets horrific precedents, goes beyond just
'piracy' with the Monster case as John pointed out, and could result
in possible follow up laws in similar countries.

--
Regards,
Austin

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