Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

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Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

Siddharth Bhat
Hello all,

I have somewhat of an unorthodox problem. I've been writing on and off, a series on implementing compilers
"beautifully" in haskell, called tiny-optimising-compiler. They're literate haskell files, with the aim
of explaining the really elegant ideas that exist in compilers literature - 
data flow analysis, abstract interpretation, SSA, continuations, scalar evolution,
and some more slightly out-there / research-y things, like polyhedral compilation,  equality saturation.

However, I'm also a research student at my university, and am expected to publish before I graduate. I was
looking for possible places to publish a project such as this, whose selling point would be "explains things
elegantly, and possibly rewords standard things to nice looking haskell". Are there places where one
could conceivably publish about such a project? If not, I forsee myself not being able to finish this project
for a while longer, and that would make me sad.

Thanks, and a merry christmas to all,
~Siddharth

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Re: Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

Kim-Ee Yeoh
Administrator
Hi Siddarth,

Something implied -- though not explicated -- in your email is that publication serves as some form of requirement before you obtain your degree, yes?

So you're looking for places where your articles can gain sufficient endorsement?

In that case, you want to find out from your department what kind of publishing standards they demand.

Among those who have graduated from your department with publications, precisely where have they published their articles?

Best, Kim-Ee

On Monday, December 24, 2018, Siddharth Bhat <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I have somewhat of an unorthodox problem. I've been writing on and off, a series on implementing compilers
"beautifully" in haskell, called tiny-optimising-compiler. They're literate haskell files, with the aim
of explaining the really elegant ideas that exist in compilers literature - 
data flow analysis, abstract interpretation, SSA, continuations, scalar evolution,
and some more slightly out-there / research-y things, like polyhedral compilation,  equality saturation.

However, I'm also a research student at my university, and am expected to publish before I graduate. I was
looking for possible places to publish a project such as this, whose selling point would be "explains things
elegantly, and possibly rewords standard things to nice looking haskell". Are there places where one
could conceivably publish about such a project? If not, I forsee myself not being able to finish this project
for a while longer, and that would make me sad.

Thanks, and a merry christmas to all,
~Siddharth


--
-- Kim-Ee

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Re: Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

mukesh tiwari
In reply to this post by Siddharth Bhat
Hi Siddharth,
I am not sure what kind of conference you are looking for, but I found  articles published in The Art, Science, and Engineering of Programming [1] pretty neat and interesting. You can have a look, and see if it's fit for your purpose.

Best,
Mukesh


On Mon, Dec 24, 2018 at 11:32 PM Siddharth Bhat <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I have somewhat of an unorthodox problem. I've been writing on and off, a series on implementing compilers
"beautifully" in haskell, called tiny-optimising-compiler. They're literate haskell files, with the aim
of explaining the really elegant ideas that exist in compilers literature - 
data flow analysis, abstract interpretation, SSA, continuations, scalar evolution,
and some more slightly out-there / research-y things, like polyhedral compilation,  equality saturation.

However, I'm also a research student at my university, and am expected to publish before I graduate. I was
looking for possible places to publish a project such as this, whose selling point would be "explains things
elegantly, and possibly rewords standard things to nice looking haskell". Are there places where one
could conceivably publish about such a project? If not, I forsee myself not being able to finish this project
for a while longer, and that would make me sad.

Thanks, and a merry christmas to all,
~Siddharth
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Re: Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

Siddharth Bhat
In reply to this post by Kim-Ee Yeoh
Hey, yep, indeed, it is considered a requirement. 


I'm not aware of people in the past who have published articles of this form - in general, the requirements are peer reviewed publications in a "good" journal / conference - measure by impact factor or what have you. Hence the question :) 

On Mon, 24 Dec, 2018, 19:21 Kim-Ee Yeoh, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Siddarth,

Something implied -- though not explicated -- in your email is that publication serves as some form of requirement before you obtain your degree, yes?

So you're looking for places where your articles can gain sufficient endorsement?

In that case, you want to find out from your department what kind of publishing standards they demand.

Among those who have graduated from your department with publications, precisely where have they published their articles?

Best, Kim-Ee


On Monday, December 24, 2018, Siddharth Bhat <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I have somewhat of an unorthodox problem. I've been writing on and off, a series on implementing compilers
"beautifully" in haskell, called tiny-optimising-compiler. They're literate haskell files, with the aim
of explaining the really elegant ideas that exist in compilers literature - 
data flow analysis, abstract interpretation, SSA, continuations, scalar evolution,
and some more slightly out-there / research-y things, like polyhedral compilation,  equality saturation.

However, I'm also a research student at my university, and am expected to publish before I graduate. I was
looking for possible places to publish a project such as this, whose selling point would be "explains things
elegantly, and possibly rewords standard things to nice looking haskell". Are there places where one
could conceivably publish about such a project? If not, I forsee myself not being able to finish this project
for a while longer, and that would make me sad.

Thanks, and a merry christmas to all,
~Siddharth


--
-- Kim-Ee
--
Sending this from my phone, please excuse any typos!

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Re: Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

Conrad Cunningham
I have no personal experience with the journal SoftwareX, but one of my department’s undergraduate computer science students published an article with a mathematics professor there. The article included a software component that the CS student did as a part of his senior honors thesis. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 24, 2018, at 8:50 AM, Siddharth Bhat <[hidden email]> wrote:

Hey, yep, indeed, it is considered a requirement. 


I'm not aware of people in the past who have published articles of this form - in general, the requirements are peer reviewed publications in a "good" journal / conference - measure by impact factor or what have you. Hence the question :) 

On Mon, 24 Dec, 2018, 19:21 Kim-Ee Yeoh, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Siddarth,

Something implied -- though not explicated -- in your email is that publication serves as some form of requirement before you obtain your degree, yes?

So you're looking for places where your articles can gain sufficient endorsement?

In that case, you want to find out from your department what kind of publishing standards they demand.

Among those who have graduated from your department with publications, precisely where have they published their articles?

Best, Kim-Ee


On Monday, December 24, 2018, Siddharth Bhat <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hello all,

I have somewhat of an unorthodox problem. I've been writing on and off, a series on implementing compilers
"beautifully" in haskell, called tiny-optimising-compiler. They're literate haskell files, with the aim
of explaining the really elegant ideas that exist in compilers literature - 
data flow analysis, abstract interpretation, SSA, continuations, scalar evolution,
and some more slightly out-there / research-y things, like polyhedral compilation,  equality saturation.

However, I'm also a research student at my university, and am expected to publish before I graduate. I was
looking for possible places to publish a project such as this, whose selling point would be "explains things
elegantly, and possibly rewords standard things to nice looking haskell". Are there places where one
could conceivably publish about such a project? If not, I forsee myself not being able to finish this project
for a while longer, and that would make me sad.

Thanks, and a merry christmas to all,
~Siddharth


--
-- Kim-Ee
--
Sending this from my phone, please excuse any typos!
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Re: Places to write and publish projects that "explain ideas"?

Siddharth Bhat
In reply to this post by Siddharth Bhat
Regarding (1), as far as I'm aware, the requirements are flexible, but the general requirement
is "published a paper at a good venue, either journal or conference". This implementation
was a hobby project of mine, but I was hoping to be able to justify spending more time on it
by finding a venue to publish it at.

As for (2), it's mostly expository. The techniques that I am interesting in showing off have no
known "simple" implementations as far as I'm aware -- scalar evolution, polyhedral
compilation, some kinds of inter-procedural analyses, SSA, etc. do not have simple 
implementations. Indeed, the goal is to show how to write optmising compilers. Most
compilers books teach one how to write a compiler, while there's a second course usually on
compiler optimisation. I don't know of readable, clean implementations of, say, the SSA
construction algorithm, or the scalar evolution analysis. 

Regarding nanopass: I think it makes a lot of sense as a philosophy as a way to architect
compilers. However, there are a lot of nice haskell-isms to write compilers which are 
scattered throughout the literature, as far as I can tell: Hoopl, trees that grow, much of
Matt might's work on abstracting abstract interpreters, Scrap-your-boilerplate style techniques,
equality saturation, etc. which are all fantastic, but I've never seen them under the
same umbrella.

So that's a sketch of the general story I want to tell :)

Thanks.
~Siddharth 


On Tue, Dec 25, 2018 at 7:30 PM Richard O'Keefe <[hidden email]> wrote:

Question 1:  what does your department require?  The first person to consult
is your supervisor.  Helping students figure out where to publish is definitely
part of a supervisor's job (speaking as a former supervisor of PhD students).

Question 2:  what is the TOPIC of your publication?  Since you are merely (!)
demonstrating known techniques on a toy language, does it really count as
work on compilers?   Is it software engineering?  Is it computer science
education?  Is the aim to develop something more maintainable?  What is the
quality metric by which your work should be judged?

Observation:  if you haven't already read the "Nanopass" paper,
you should do so now.  http://nanopass.org/ is the associated web site.
There is also a mailing list,
I think your aims are sufficiently close to theirs for you to have
interesting things to say to each other, despite you using Haskell and
them having used Scheme.



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