Seeking the correct quote

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Seeking the correct quote

Jacques Carette
I have heard generic programming described tongue-in-cheek as "the kind
of polymorphism that a language does not (yet) have".  I find this
description rather apt, and it matches fairly what I see called
'generic' in various communities.  But who said this, where and when?

Jacques
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Seeking the correct quote

sclv
I first encountered this quip on ltu:
http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/1926#comment-23411

However, that comment doesn't give a source either.

Cheers,
Sterl.

On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 4:23 PM, Jacques Carette <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I have heard generic programming described tongue-in-cheek as "the kind of
> polymorphism that a language does not (yet) have".  I find this description
> rather apt, and it matches fairly what I see called 'generic' in various
> communities.  But who said this, where and when?
>
> Jacques
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Seeking the correct quote

Brad Larsen
In reply to this post by Jacques Carette
On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 4:23 PM, Jacques Carette <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I have heard generic programming described tongue-in-cheek as "the kind of
> polymorphism that a language does not (yet) have".  I find this description
> rather apt, and it matches fairly what I see called 'generic' in various
> communities.  But who said this, where and when?
>
> Jacques
> _______________________________________________
> Haskell-Cafe mailing list
> [hidden email]
> http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
>

I don't have the book handy (it was from the library), but I seem to
remember reading something along those lines in ``Datatype-Generic
Programming:  International Spring School, SSDGP 2006, Nottingham, UK,
April 24-27, 2006, Revised Lectures'', edited by Backhouse, Gibbons,
Hinze, and Jeuring.

There's a lead for you, at least!

Regards,
Brad
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Seeking the correct quote

Jacques Carette
Bradford Larsen wrote:

> On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 4:23 PM, Jacques Carette <[hidden email]> wrote:
>  
>> I have heard generic programming described tongue-in-cheek as "the kind of
>> polymorphism that a language does not (yet) have".  I find this description
>> rather apt, and it matches fairly what I see called 'generic' in various
>> communities.  But who said this, where and when?
>>    
> I seem to
> remember reading something along those lines in ``Datatype-Generic
> Programming:  International Spring School, SSDGP 2006, Nottingham, UK,
> April 24-27, 2006, Revised Lectures'', edited by Backhouse, Gibbons,
> Hinze, and Jeuring.
I've got that book in my office - I'll check tomorrow.  I read the
preface before I posted on -cafe, and it wasnt' there.  I'll read
further in, see if I can spot it.

Jacques
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Seeking the correct quote

Jacques Carette
In reply to this post by sclv
Sterling Clover wrote:
> I first encountered this quip on ltu:
> http://lambda-the-ultimate.org/node/1926#comment-23411
>
> However, that comment doesn't give a source either.
>  
Probably where I remembered it from too.  I'll continue searching - it's
a good quote!

Jacques
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Seeking the correct quote

Jacques Carette
In reply to this post by Brad Larsen
Bradford Larsen wrote:
> I don't have the book handy (it was from the library), but I seem to
> remember reading something along those lines in ``Datatype-Generic
> Programming:  International Spring School, SSDGP 2006, Nottingham, UK,
> April 24-27, 2006, Revised Lectures'', edited by Backhouse, Gibbons,
> Hinze, and Jeuring.
>  
The spirit is there in quotes like

"The term ‘generic programming’ means different things to different people,
because they have different ideas about how to achieve the common goal
of combining
flexibility and safety. To some people, it means parametric polymorphism;
to others, it means libraries of algorithms and data structures; to
another group,
it means reflection and meta-programming; to us, it means polytypism,
that is,
type-safe parametrization by a datatype "

and

"Moreover, a parametrization is usually only called ‘generic’
programming if it
is of a ‘non-traditional’ kind; by definition, traditional kinds of
parametrization
give rise only to traditional programming, not generic programming.
Therefore, ‘genericity’ is in the eye of the beholder, with beholders
from different
programming traditions having different interpretations of the term."

But nothing 'snappy'. Ah well.

Jacques
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe