historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Previous Topic Next Topic
 
classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
6 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Michael Vanier
We always say that Haskell is named for Haskell Curry because his work provided the
logical/computational foundations for the language.  How exactly is this the case?  Specifically,
does anyone claim that Curry's combinatorial logic is more relevant to the theoretical foundations
of Haskell than e.g. Church's lambda calculus?  If not, why isn't Haskell called "Alonzo"? ;-)

Mike

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Tim Chevalier
On 7/18/07, Michael Vanier <[hidden email]> wrote:
> We always say that Haskell is named for Haskell Curry because his work provided the
> logical/computational foundations for the language.  How exactly is this the case?  Specifically,
> does anyone claim that Curry's combinatorial logic is more relevant to the theoretical foundations
> of Haskell than e.g. Church's lambda calculus?  If not, why isn't Haskell called "Alonzo"? ;-)

I'd guess it's because Haskell is a language that provides type
inference, and Curry's logic is implicitly typed, whereas Church's
typed lambda calculus is typed explicitly. (Why no Haskell compilers'
intermediate languages are named "Alonzo" is left as an exercise for
the reader :-)

Cheers,
Tim

--
Tim Chevalier* catamorphism.org *Often in error, never in doubt
"Base eight is just like base ten, really... if you're missing two
fingers."  -- Tom Lehrer
_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Jon Fairbairn
In reply to this post by Michael Vanier
Michael Vanier <[hidden email]> writes:

> We always say that Haskell is named for Haskell Curry
> because his work provided the logical/computational
> foundations for the language.  How exactly is this the case?
> Specifically, does anyone claim that Curry's combinatorial
> logic is more relevant to the theoretical foundations of
> Haskell than e.g. Church's lambda calculus?

At the time the name was chosen, SK combinators had been one
of the main ways of implementing lazy functional
languages. Although they had already been supplanted by
compilation to more general combinators, some form of
combinators were still part of the compilation process, so
the connexion with combinatory logic was fresh in our minds.

> If not, why isn't Haskell called "Alonzo"? ;-)

I think that was one of the suggestions made among many
others. Haskell has the advantage of sounding less like a
person's name (which might have been why Curry didn't like
it).

--
Jón Fairbairn                                 [hidden email]


_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Conor McBride
In reply to this post by Tim Chevalier

On 19 Jul 2007, at 03:40, Tim Chevalier wrote:

> On 7/18/07, Michael Vanier <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> We always say that Haskell is named for Haskell Curry because his  
>> work provided the
>> logical/computational foundations for the language.  How exactly  
>> is this the case?  Specifically,
>> does anyone claim that Curry's combinatorial logic is more  
>> relevant to the theoretical foundations
>> of Haskell than e.g. Church's lambda calculus?  If not, why isn't  
>> Haskell called "Alonzo"? ;-)
>
> I'd guess it's because Haskell is a language that provides type
> inference, and Curry's logic is implicitly typed, whereas Church's
> typed lambda calculus is typed explicitly. (Why no Haskell compilers'
> intermediate languages are named "Alonzo" is left as an exercise for
> the reader :-)

On the hand, Marcin Benke's compiler for the Agda 2 dependently typed
programming language is called Alonzo. But it uses an intermediate
language named after Curry...

Dependent type systems rely on having a bit more type information around
(although not usually on a lambda, if you set things up well), so the
connection with Church is perhaps more appropriate.

Cheers

Conor

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Re: historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Hudak, Paul
In reply to this post by Jon Fairbairn
Jon Fairbairn wrote:
If not, why isn't Haskell called "Alonzo"? ;-)
    

I think that was one of the suggestions made among many
others. Haskell has the advantage of sounding less like a
person's name (which might have been why Curry didn't like
it)

Actually, the more compelling reason we chose "Haskell" over "Alonzo" was that, at the time, Church was alive -- he died in 1995 -- whereas Curry was not -- he died in 1982.  We felt uncomfortable naming the language after someone who still alive (however odd that may sound).

    -Paul


_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: historical question about Haskell and Haskell Curry

Jon Fairbairn
Paul Hudak <[hidden email]> writes:


> Actually, the more compelling reason we chose "Haskell"
> over "Alonzo" was that, at the time, Church was alive --
> he died in 1995 -- whereas Curry was not -- he died in
> 1982.  We felt uncomfortable naming the language after
> someone who still alive (however odd that may sound).

Oh yes. I had forgotten that.

--
Jón Fairbairn                                 [hidden email]

_______________________________________________
Haskell-Cafe mailing list
[hidden email]
http://www.haskell.org/mailman/listinfo/haskell-cafe